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View Full Version : Had a lovely day in America today



Ian Gills
10-08-2011, 04:25 PM
For about four weeks in the year America has the most fantastic weather. It's about two weeks in the Spring and two weeks in the Fall.

The rest of the year is either too hot (thanks to American-made global warming) or too cold (because of the jet stream).

But today was one of those glorious days. I went to a Fall Festival, full of pumpkins, country music and pork/beef rolls.

It was a very nice day in America.

jimbo
10-08-2011, 05:28 PM
Glad you enjoyed your two weeks. May we now suggest that you leave??? Just a thought!!

We have about 360 days a year of unbeatable weather in San Diego, but we do try to keep that a secret because then everyone will want to come here!

Ian Gills
10-09-2011, 06:25 AM
Why are so many of you so keen to get this person, who just happens to be an immigrant, to leave?

I did a poll a few years ago and the overwhelming majority said I should stay.

What has changed?

Is it the economy?

If I do go, you'll have another foreclosed property to deal with.

Well, I say foreclosed. More of a case of "key left in the door".

Gary in NJ
10-09-2011, 08:03 AM
thanks to American-made global warming

Do you make inflammatory statements to incite, or are you just a moron?

You are clearly a socialist (and best) and have a deep disdain for the American people and its form of government. You are akin to those who move next to an airport and then complain about all of the noise. You should have chosen your home more carefully.

Soon I will grow tired of arguing with you. So far I'm having good sport.

master plumber mark
10-09-2011, 09:00 AM
another stupid ass statement made by Ian...
pissing and moaning about the evil empire

everything is Americas fault... global warming is all comming
from america,
its not from the super power not china,
not from bankrupt europe, and certainly not shitty old England.....

If the weather is so crappy here how come you want to stay????
it must be all the free benefits.

zl700
10-09-2011, 09:40 AM
It may be too late to send him back but, if we stop posting responses he will surely go away.

BobL43
10-09-2011, 09:41 AM
Do you make inflammatory statements to incite, or are you just a moron?

You are clearly a socialist (and best) and have a deep disdain for the American people and its form of government. You are akin to those who move next to an airport and then complain about all of the noise. You should have chosen your home more carefully.

Soon I will grow tired of arguing with you. So far I'm having good sport.

Personally, I beieve Ian's goal is to inflame us all so we make derogatory defaming statements of him here so he can somehow sue us and live on his settlement or "entitlement" and go back to merry old england and live like a king. Just my SWAG.:(

BobL43
10-09-2011, 09:43 AM
another stupid ass statement made by Ian...
pissing and moaning about the evil empire

everything is Americas fault... global warming is all comming
from america,
its not from the super power not china,
not from bankrupt europe, and certainly not shitty old England.....

If the weather is so crappy here how come you want to stay????
it must be all the free benefits.

choose your words carefully or ignore. my opinion

Ian Gills
10-09-2011, 10:39 AM
You are a sensitive bunch. I'm not going to sue anyone. It's all about the debate!

There is now indisputable evidence that the world is warming. Furthermore, scientists are 90% confident that global warming is man-made.

I agree that China is now the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide. But it only recently took first place from the USA.

It's not rocket science. There are so many cars here. And you're a big, rich, energy hungry country to boot.

So to avoid further (possibly catastrophic) damage we must begin to mitigate. Or we can adapt. Move well away from the coast if you choose the latter.

And whoever said I hate America's government could not be further from the truth. I think it does a great job and should be made bigger.

I also adore the people. I have written that hundreds of times on these pages.

But it should not stop us from striving to make the ol' place better.

We need to end this sense of entitlement to pollute. America should set the example for the rest of the world.

Lose the V8. Cap and trade.


World CO2 emissions 2006
http://www.stanfordalumni.org/news/magazine/sage/201001/cooling/images/pie_chart_countries.jpg

Cookie
10-09-2011, 04:18 PM
... ... ... ... ... reading... ... ....

type....type...type... :) it is not me.

Cookie
10-09-2011, 07:57 PM
... I am pretty sure Bob did that.

Terry
10-09-2011, 09:00 PM
China is sure catching up in the polution pie chart. And I'm sure their number is only going to increase.
So Saturday I decided to walk while golfing instead of driving a cart. I wanted to do my part. Today I drove out to North Bend to watch a skiing movie with friends. It took some gas, but walking while golfing will make up for it..........Not!
Last Thursday I went for a walk in the mountains to Franklin Falls. Our Summer was in September this year. Maybe a little bit of August too. I do remember doing some hikes then and some kayaking. It's all good in the hood guys.

http://www.terrylove.com/images/terry/twin_falls_1648.jpg
Twin Falls, about 30 minutes from my home. A nice hike to do after work in the Seattle area.

http://www.terrylove.com/images/terry/twin_falls_1652.jpg

http://www.terrylove.com/images/terry/franklin_falls_1679.jpg

Franklin Falls after work. 45 minutes from my home. This was done on a cloudy day that was misty.

http://www.terrylove.com/images/terry/franklin_falls_1675.jpg

BillyJoeJimBob
10-09-2011, 10:47 PM
I spent 3 years on Camp Pendleton (near San Diego), and he is correct. It rains 30 days each spring there, and is absolutely perfect the rest of the year. It's too perfect, like eating too much choclate, you get sick of how perfect the weather is. Clear skies, low humidity, perfect temperature, each and ever day. I hated it. It was like listening to your favorite song over & over & over again, so many times that when you finally stop playing it, you hate it and never want to listen to it again.

I'll never go back to San Diego. It's too pleasant, and the people (unlike LA) are also pleasant and well-educated. I'm too low-class for all of that, and can only be happy (like Ian) by complaining, in my case it's about ungodly high temperatures, high humidity, no rain in 12 months, cockroaches and and infestation of "immigrants" from the south that make a point of having a few beers before they get behind the wheel, because they think it makes them drive better.

The horrible truth is that it does.

I was annoyed by Ian at first, I admit, but his wife is attractive and so I forgive him. Or wait, was that Terry's wife?

Cookie
10-10-2011, 02:35 AM
Terry, that last picture looks alot like the run that is on my mountain property! I hike there, flip over fossils and weather permitting the boys & I would enjoy the cool water. On each side there are bear dens but, thankfully, never presented a problem. We are careful near them, and only once, I peeked inside one. I saw alot of berries and ran.

Looks like you had a great time, great pictures, too. Sue looks so sweet Terry.

Looks like you might see a beaver dam there, we get those at times.

Tom Sawyer
10-10-2011, 04:12 AM
This from a guy from england where it's cold damp and rains 1/2 the year

LOTW
10-10-2011, 07:08 AM
Beautiful waterfalls Terry. I wonder what it is about human development which attracts us to falling water? My view on Ian's Corner is that everyone benefits from a frank exchange of ideas, as long as this exchange is done without malice or personal rancor. Like most things in life, the best course may well be to avoid the extremes and to always walk away from the conversation with respect, if not agreement.

Cookie
10-10-2011, 09:08 AM
I agree. And, if Ian sends cash it works even better :) I will always agree. I take Pay Pal. lol.

ballvalve
10-10-2011, 12:13 PM
He likes our pumpkins, meat rolls and some valves. Can't be all bad.

If he bought a nice US made JD excavator, or Ruger rifle, he would learn to love American manufacturing.

Terry
10-10-2011, 12:16 PM
Ballvalve, I was thinking of you yesterday watching a ski movie. This was in Utah, and they would take their guns and skis up to the mountains and if the weather was too bad for skiing, they would shoot the crap out of everything they could see. One of the guys had an assault rifle. We were laughing pretty good in the theater.

Ian Gills
10-10-2011, 02:46 PM
I bought some delicious pumpkins today from a Fall Festival.

It really is a nice time of the year to be in America.

As for the debates we have, well in the words of Nancy Pelosi, "It's the American system...we don't always have to agree".

We luv ya Nancy!


http://youtu.be/95cYSj3glCg

jimbo
10-10-2011, 03:57 PM
The day I agree with anything commie pinko pelosi has to say...just put the nails in my coffin,.

ballvalve
10-11-2011, 11:11 AM
1417914178
Ballvalve, I was thinking of you yesterday watching a ski movie. This was in Utah, and they would take their guns and skis up to the mountains and if the weather was too bad for skiing, they would shoot the crap out of everything they could see. One of the guys had an assault rifle. We were laughing pretty good in the theater.

Thanks for the thought, but no assault rifles for me, and the greatest respect when using any sort of them. For the people around and the enviroment. My shoot em up days ended years ago when as a kid dad caught us shooting a treeful of sparrows - made us pluck, cook and eat them all. I might shoot a quail once a year nowadays, but I have always been repulsed about kiling an animal larger than myself, and especially by those that kill them for a 'mount'. Hogs and sausages are another story.

And hardly a chance to break a leg when target practicing.

Lest you consider me a wildman, my real hobby is antiquarian book collecting, 1500's and forward. Heavy on mining history and techniques. I'll try and post a picture of my library. Built everything you see too, except the sofa.

Ian Gills
10-11-2011, 01:46 PM
I, for one, and Bob, for another, are still waiting for a picture of the sausage(s) Ballvalve.

But nice library. America was still a colony when some of those books were written.

The joists look a little flimsy though. Hope they're not load bearing.

BobL43
10-11-2011, 01:58 PM
The joists look a little flimsy though. Hope they're not load bearing.

says Ian, as he sets his trap

Cookie
10-11-2011, 02:39 PM
yeah, but he didn't notice the missing brick above the header, lol. no eye for detail...

REALLY, nice Ballsvalve...

BobL43
10-11-2011, 02:50 PM
yeah, but he didn't notice the missing brick above the header, lol. no eye for detail...

REALLY, nice Ballsvalve... No header needed over that massive arch; I think that's just a little mortar smear and brick at the top of the arch. I built a nice arched fireplace years ago, but it did not require as much support form as this one!
Arches have tremendous strength; the Romans used them all over the place.

Cookie
10-11-2011, 03:10 PM
Jeez, Bob, you gave it away, LOL...

It is just really nice isn't it? A comfy looking place to sit with a (american ) tea, and a good book, :)

Ian Gills
10-11-2011, 03:38 PM
I hope there isn't an aquarium sitting on the floor above those joists.

Probably just American growth too. Not the strong stuff imported from Europe.

ballvalve
10-12-2011, 11:10 AM
1419114192
I, for one, and Bob, for another, are still waiting for a picture of the sausage(s) Ballvalve.

But nice library. America was still a colony when some of those books were written.

The joists look a little flimsy though. Hope they're not load bearing.

Those precious beams were salvaged from a 1800's sawmill floor and are about 7x14". The span is actually less than 16 feet as I recall. and the next [2] floors up are exactly the same, but a dining room and bedroom with more of the beams. 2" concrete floors poured OVER them for radiant and fire protection. I would have used English oak, but its all in guarded parks now, and sunk in oceans after raping and pillaging the earth.

The beams are load bearing, and the "decking" over them is 2"x24" sugar pine milled off the land.

Good eye Cookie. That arch is a rather interesting construction - made a huge form on a slab, then made the window and door unit to fit just inside it. [ made the laminations deep enough so that I ended up witha second 'free' window after bandsawing it out - That would have made a good tv show] Then moved it to the site and erected it in one piece. I think its 16" deep. Bricked up the outer faces and filled the inside with massive amounts of steel. That missing part is to be a marble "keystone" with inscription. Never got to it.

Had to do it that way to survive the next earthquake. Had quite a few already.

The upper floors beams were done as coffered- a tribute to one great English technique.

Added pics: Looks like it would hold an aquarium, eh mate? And the staircase, which is all stucco, should bring you right home Ian. Scratched the stucco until midnight with retarders and 2 or 3 bottles of wine.

ballvalve
10-12-2011, 11:11 AM
And by the way, Ian, the sausages are hanging on your forum for a long time now. I'll see if I can find them and report back.

"things you dont see in america- page 2"

Cookie
10-12-2011, 11:22 AM
Nice, very nice.
The inscription, can you say what it would be, I understand it you don't want, if it is private.

Cookie
10-12-2011, 11:50 AM
I had my eye on a log cabin years ago near where I live. It was in rough condition, because it was the oldest log cabin here in my county. Everything about it was original, the chinking, the way the wood was rounded, the variance of the floors, oh, I loved it. Loved it. It sat on a wonderful 2 acres of land, and the barn was grandfathered in, and the wood was lovely. Another outside structure, to me was of even greater interest. And, anyone who knows me, knows why. Hemingway did some of his work from it.

I could envision a beauty of it that my husband couldn't see. He thought we would look like the Clampetts and he was more of a contemporary person, whereas, I value and love the old. I even brought in my relative, ( one i like) who is a huge contractor, and he checked out the foundation and all, giving it a thumps up, letting me know, what would need fixed, like the heating, and, giving me a cost estimate.

The downstairs was beautiful.

The owner inherited it and showed me the data on it all. How, one her great grandmothers was first woman sheriff in this county, and it was hers. I sat for hours with this woman reading and looking over all the documented history. She was a librarian. One could had called this woman eccentric, but, I found her very likeable. She had a baby grand piano she was willing to leave along, with... and, I lost my breath when she said this, " all my books." She had a wonderful library. Sure, they were stacked everywhere but, that didn't matter to me.

I went numb.

Sure, both inside and outside needed work. No doubt about that. But, she only wanted 76,000 back then, about 20 years, and it was affordable, if not to me, cheap.

I would ride past that house and in time, someone bought it and gutted it. They didn't realize the value in the wood of the barn for that laid in a chopped up pile of debris, and, where Hemmingway worked, is only left now, in my mind's eye.

What a loss.

ballvalve
10-12-2011, 02:41 PM
Many Americans are brainless when it comes to construction and deconstruction. We toss our history for plastic and foam houses. The American Brass factory, 20 acres of red brick walls, 20' tall, went right to the landfill back in the 80's in Wisconsin.

And Ian, be sure to go back to page 2 and see my aquarium holders. Made those too.

Cookie
10-12-2011, 06:53 PM
There is an article including a photo on Yahoo about what a house will look like in I think, they said, 2035. It is a far cry to me, what is comfy and cozy. Some people like the look of white, clean, sterile environment. Oh, I don't. I love the brick, the carpentry, plaster instead of all dry wall, I like something which fits like an ole' shoe. What you did is really perfect. I like the stacks with the ladder. I was truly heart broken over that house, that log cabin. I had designs for it, and knew I could make it something so beautiful and so rare, I would had sent photos to a magazine for log cabin homes.

I won't even tell you what it increased in value. Which is besides the point because, they took down that barn. Threw the wood away. I stopped the car and couldn't believe what I was seeing. Then, they put up one of those fab mod garages.

I was the perfect buyer for that place. Oh, well. I don't even like to think about it.

ballvalve
10-12-2011, 10:38 PM
You are speaking of the "Ikea culture" the New Yorker magazine had a great article last week about the sterility and disposability of furniture and household items that are now being created.

I built a house that slapped that culture in the face, and like my family from East Europe, built for the next three generations - at least- their philosophy is wood inside, and stone, stucco and cement outside. Considering that 30 homes around me burned in the fire 3 years ago, and Fox and ABC did special filming here as the only one to survive, I would say its a damn good tradition.

Funny, but the 15 or so to rebuild around me have houses even more likely to burn in the next fire.

But I love log houses and always wanted to build one. I have the logs and the equipment, but my back is starting to feel the effects of a life of over zealous 12 hour days of work.

As to the house, remember hindsight is 20/20 and I have a hundred such memories.

Cookie
10-13-2011, 02:53 AM
I laughed when you said about hindsight being 20/20 for, yes, that is true. I got alot of those myself. Usually, where it regards relatives, and, then I give them the leeway for the anguish is sometimes, too much to bear. :)

My love of real estate started because I love houses. That is the reason I started in it. I grew up in a neighborhood where the homes were old and most of them today, by the way, are standing quite well. It had taken time to build those houses. Brick by brick by brick. Today, the workmanship isn't there for the most part. I see houses where, I see a crack and think, yeah it could be settlement but, I know really in most cases it was because the home was thrown up overnight. Mistakes. Mistakes. Some are gorgeous but, you know, the quality materials weren't used, and the quality of work isn't going to be there. I see things that people wrote off on, and I wonder how that passed, for things weren't tied off, or connections weren't made, or even simple things like...um, the carpeting isn't secured. It is sad to see such prices being charged for homes I stand and stare at and think, how many years this home will last. I check the foundations and wonder a few things and shake my head walking away. I can't say anything to potential buyers. So, I stand and stare and hope someone notices.

It is what it is I guess. But, it is nice to see a home that you just know, will be around a long long time without showing its wear in but a few years. A solid house.

I love the character that is usually involved. And... the detail of the work. And, yes, I do have an eye for detail. I will notice dove tailed joints when no one else will. I love the lighting in your place. What I can't stand is when you walk into a house, walk into the big kitchen and there are 20 recessed lights. I feel like I am in a spaceship ready to take off.

BobL43
10-13-2011, 06:35 AM
1419114192

Those precious beams were salvaged from a 1800's sawmill floor and are about 7x14". The span is actually less than 16 feet as I recall. and the next [2] floors up are exactly the same, but a dining room and bedroom with more of the beams. 2" concrete floors poured OVER them for radiant and fire protection. I would have used English oak, but its all in guarded parks now, and sunk in oceans after raping and pillaging the earth.

The beams are load bearing, and the "decking" over them is 2"x24" sugar pine milled off the land.

Good eye Cookie. That arch is a rather interesting construction - made a huge form on a slab, then made the window and door unit to fit just inside it. [ made the laminations deep enough so that I ended up witha second 'free' window after bandsawing it out - That would have made a good tv show] Then moved it to the site and erected it in one piece. I think its 16" deep. Bricked up the outer faces and filled the inside with massive amounts of steel. That missing part is to be a marble "keystone" with inscription. Never got to it.

Had to do it that way to survive the next earthquake. Had quite a few already.

The upper floors beams were done as coffered- a tribute to one great English technique.

Added pics: Looks like it would hold an aquarium, eh mate? And the staircase, which is all stucco, should bring you right home Ian. Scratched the stucco until midnight with retarders and 2 or 3 bottles of wine.

Those joist hangers are works of art too; love 'em!

BobL43
10-13-2011, 06:37 AM
I hope there isn't an aquarium sitting on the floor above those joists.

Probably just American growth too. Not the strong stuff imported from Europe.

strong and imported? well, odor isn't everything.

Ian Gills
10-13-2011, 07:09 AM
It all looks a bit wobbly to me.

Do the floors bounce?

ballvalve
10-13-2011, 09:24 AM
Only if you have a fetish for odd acts with an elephant. They have bounced nicely in earthquakes.