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View Full Version : Is this important in a sink strainer?



Minni
11-13-2004, 04:26 PM
Is it important to have either a "tall nut" or "locking tall nut" in a sink strainer's body?

These terms weren't listed in the online plumbing dictionary.

Thank you.

jimbo
11-13-2004, 04:53 PM
These refer to methods by which a particular strainer is attached into the sink. Each manufacturer may have several different styles. You do not need to concern about these details. Choose a strainer based on quality of materials, finish, type of basket, and cost.

Cab Calloway sends.....

Minni
11-13-2004, 11:26 PM
jimbo, which of the below strainers do you think would be the easiest to clean out bits of debris such as tiny salad leafs? Unfortunately, I know that debris tends to get caught between the circumferance of the basket & the strainer body (except for the "old-fashioned" ones with drop posts - as if I need any stopper-plugs altogether!)

But even among the ones that have stick posts, which of the below do you think would be most trouble free? And if any of them come with tall nuts or locking nuts for an added price, would you recommend those over the ones without same?

http://www.ayers-associates.com/products/garvin.html

BTW, what I'd really prefer most might be something like this except in stainless steel, and without the stopper-part, but only if I could be sure that it stays in place via a non-skid underpart: http://shop.store.yahoo.com/kitchenhome/popinst30.html

P.S. Speak of "spin & grin" I'd like to tell Garvin that my head is certainly spinning, and I'm surely not grinning! Since their product descriptions are clear as mud...

hj
11-14-2004, 04:00 AM
If there is any reference to "tall nuts" or "tail nuts" it is strictly advertising hype. Any one of the listed drains will work, but if you do not need a basket than a "perforated flat strainer" might be what you are looking for. The Spin-N-Grin has a basket that spins/screws into the body for a positive seal. They were originally designed for use in boats where a post strainer could be popped out during rough seas and allow water into the boat.

jimbo
11-14-2004, 07:39 AM
This is a difficult item to purchase from someplace where you cannot 'reach out and touch it'. I would say that if you stay away from very inexpensive ones, then you will get a unit which operates smoothly and fully seals the basket when you want to fill the sink. In a cheaper unit, these will be the two complaints. In a chrome finish, expect to pay $15 to $50 dollars. The most expensive ones will be very heavy cast brass with very heavy and highly polished chrome finish. I would avoid any of the units under $12, although their stainless steel construction will be long lasting. For heavens sake don'tbuy one that is all plastic.

The newer finishes ( satin nickel, polished brass, rubbed bronze, etc. ) can add considerably to the price. I always avoid white or almond, as these are enameled finishes and will NOT LAST.


The business about the nuts is underneath the sink. Forget about it.

Minni
11-14-2004, 05:02 PM
Thank you both!

I have some followups:

First of all, hj, I browsed for perforated strainers, and came across the following which warns that they clog rapidly.
http://lightning.prohosting.com/~piping/strainer/fp.htm
BTW, were you talking about those strainers that are found on standard bath tubs? If so, where are they available?

jimbo, the white pop-in strainer URL is just the basket, isn't it? So why does it matter if it's white, if it isn't the actual body? I'm not saying that metal isn't better even in a basket, but it's not as if it's the actual strainer - just the basket part.

jimbo
11-14-2004, 06:56 PM
First, that link you posted about strainers has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with kitchens or anything in your house for that matter. You are making this WAY TOO HARD!


Yes, the white strainer you showed is just an accessory to keep things out of the disposal when you use that sink a lot for 'regular' kitchen use. They are pop-in, plastic,very inexpensive, and easily replaced. I use one myself.

hj
11-14-2004, 07:05 PM
That refers to an "inline" stainer, and is compared to a "Y" strainer which has a much larger surface area. It has nothing to do with a sink strainer. It is similar to an older tub drain, but not the same since it has larger openings and is a greater diameter.

Minni
11-15-2004, 04:04 PM
So where does one find perforated strainers (or in-line strainers) or whatever they're called?
(complete with metal strainer body - not just the strainer)

And what do they cost?

Also, if it says "all stainless steel body" or "chrome on brass" is one any better than the other? If so, why?

jimbo
11-15-2004, 06:41 PM
Forget about perforated, forget about inline, forget about nuts. This is all nuts. We are talking about a "kitchen sink basket strainer". That's it. You can buy them at any hardware, box store, Walmart, Depot, Lowes, etc. Or from many internet sources.


Some of these are made of stamped stainless steel. If you buy a good quality one, it should last FOREVER. The ones which are cast brass will tend to be heavier, not necessarily better just for that reason. However, chrome can be polished to a much shinier almost mirror finish. Stainless will look good just not as shiny. Also a brass one can have a polished brass or satin nickel look as well.

The stainless steel versions run $5 to $15. The cast brass will run $15 to $50. You get to decide.

hj
11-15-2004, 07:51 PM
California Tubular #573-016B is one version. They cost about the same as a basket strainer.

Minni
11-16-2004, 08:52 PM
Some of these are made of stamped stainless steel. If you buy a good quality one, it should last FOREVER. The ones which are cast brass will tend to be heavier, not necessarily better just for that reason. However, chrome can be polished to a much shinier almost mirror finish. Stainless will look good just not as shiny. Also a brass one can have a polished brass or satin nickel look as well.

The stainless steel versions run $5 to $15. The cast brass will run $15 to $50. You get to decide.

jimbo, thanks for the info! This was very helpful. :o
Y'know, it's a curiosity that (at least on ****) the Delta chrome single lever faucets have been quite cheaper than the same exact faucet in stainless steel. Yet seemingly paradoxically, chrome strainers cost more than stainless steel strainers.

jimbo
11-17-2004, 07:59 AM
That's a good observation about the stainless. In the case of faucet finishes, chrome is equivalent to white refrigerators. They sell probably 100 times more of those colors than all other finishes put together, so it's just the good old supply and demand equation at work!


Just a personal note: I wonder if all the people who are leaping on the Satin Nickel bandwagon are the same people who still have avocado washing machines and pink toilets!

hj
11-17-2004, 08:21 AM
Maybe not, but I'll bet they have antique brass bathroom fixtures.

LonnythePlumber
11-17-2004, 09:21 AM
Isn't the strainer stainless steel and the faucet a stainless steel finish? Two different things.

hj
11-17-2004, 02:47 PM
Off the subject but Minni, do you realize that many people have remodeled entire kitchens in the time you have spent on this sink?

jadnashua
11-17-2004, 05:02 PM
Some faucets are a stainless steel look, but some (like one I bought) are solid cast/machined stainless. Those that just look like stainless are cheaper. You can't cover up a solid stainless steel finishing glitch, since you are not plating on a layer - it's all hanging out. Same faucet in chrome vs stainless was about a 40% savings.

Minni
11-17-2004, 08:48 PM
To PM or not to PM that is the Q...

jimbo
11-17-2004, 11:30 PM
It's late, Minni, so I am missing the point. PM?


However, as hj pointed out people have built an entire house in less time than we have all spent on this sink. Now, we enjoy these forums; but just how long have you been without your kitchen sink? Are you eating only fast food?

hj
11-18-2004, 05:18 AM
I suggested a long time ago that she might be better off closing off the kitchen and eating out every day.

LonnythePlumber
11-18-2004, 05:36 AM
Posters don't have the same vision we do on plumbing. That's part of the reason they post. We are a site that uses the posters questions and comments to reflect on our trade practices. This poster and others may prefer a uniform and agreed answer that is not always available. I think we should cut them some slack. They may see us as a straight yes or no site.
I don't know what PM means but it may mean whether to post a message or not.

booman
06-07-2005, 06:28 AM
I just talked to someone at Garvin and the "BTN" means "brass tail nut" and the "BLTN" means "brass locking and tail nut". The locking nut referred to is the big one that locks the strainer basket to the sink and the tail nut connects the tailpiece at the bottom of the strainer. Brass is required in certain parts of the country and the person didnt know why. It is not "tall" nut but "tail" nut. Hope this helps clarify because I was also totally confused. Garvin is a great brand and is made in the USA. This is really the only product they make.

hj
06-07-2005, 07:09 AM
In generic terms it is a "slip nut", and is used for many things other than as a "tailpiece" nut. The Spin-N-Grin drain was created by SAYCO back in the 50's so they must have purchased the rights from them, or are having it made for them.