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Ian Gills
07-21-2011, 12:32 PM
Well, it's all come together for the next few days.

Americans caused global warming by driving cars that are too big on gas that is not taxed enough.

So the world warms up and America with it with large areas of the country for the next few days forecast to experience over 100 degree heat.

So we all put the AC on.

But because you have been so tight and cheap about keeping your infrastructure up to scratch (unlike in Europe) there is a chance that the high voltage network will not be able to cope.

This is a problem.

I say tax the lot.

ballvalve
07-21-2011, 12:39 PM
And in the Sierra mountains we have had 86' weather for a week, and more rain than in 25 years.

TJanak
07-21-2011, 08:31 PM
We lived without air conditioning for thousands of years. Those who whine and complain are a bunch of pansies.

I couldn't care less if the A/C went out. My wife would beg to differ though...

DonL
07-22-2011, 10:54 AM
Bla, Bla, Bla.

Suck it up Ian.

You sure do Bitch a lot.

Just like a Woman with PMS.

BobL43
07-22-2011, 03:49 PM
Ian, go breathe some air in China or India. At least we try to reduce pollution here. Oh, escuse me for a minute, I've got to turn the AC down. Its above 100 degrees here today and I need a greater thermal shock when I come in from outside.

BobL43
07-22-2011, 04:03 PM
Ok, I'm back. now what was I saying? Excuse me. please; (can't be rude here)

Ian Gills
07-23-2011, 08:16 AM
New Yorkers are the most short on manners by far.

But the bottom line is your car is heating up my planet.

Take the bus.

BobL43
07-23-2011, 10:36 AM
New Yorkers are the most short on manners by far.

But the bottom line is your car is heating up my planet.

Take the bus.
But Ian, how do you know that I do not use public transportation as many New Yorkers do, to commute? Our MTA system here in the NY Metro area has the largest ridership in Northern America. Your bandwidth is causing much pollution here you know. New Yorkers' manners may seem rude to outsiders, but we really are not, especially to each other. You know, we don't want to get shot or stabbed by somebody for no good reason. I've been to every state in the US except 3: Alaska, Washington, and Oregon. People in many states are nicer than New Yorkers, but rather odd in many other ways I think. The DC population is not so nice, as there are too many politicians and criminals (is there a difference?) there.

http://www.mta.info/mta/network.htm so, all these people are NOT using there cars to get to work or even go to the big apple from the 'burbs

Enjoy the rest of your day Ian. I know I will especially if you keep posting.

BobL43
07-23-2011, 10:38 AM
Bla, Bla, Bla.

Suck it up Ian.

You sure do Bitch a lot.

Just like a Woman with PMS.

He does have a very nice shirt, though Don.:eek:

Tom Sawyer
07-23-2011, 10:58 AM
Everyone should be required to have electric cars in the city. Hmmmmmm imagine thousands of extension cords hanging out of windows on Beacon street......LOL

ballvalve
08-29-2011, 11:33 AM
Americans caused global warming by driving cars that are too big on gas that is not taxed enough.


English caused global warming with Newcomens crappy steam engine that burned up every tree and coal seam in England and in hundreds of other nations with about a 2% efficiency rating.

Their only good done was to kill a few tens of millions during exploration with syphyllis and smallpox and overwork. And hideous wars with long knives. Only the black death gave the earth a pause from the attacks of the English.

Ian Gills
08-29-2011, 11:45 AM
The climate threat is real and there is strong scientific evidence that American activity is the dominant cause of global warming that has occurred over the past fifty years. In 2011, China accounted for 22.3% of global carbon dioxide emissions and the US 19.1%. The UK accounted for just 1.7% in the same year.

America is just too big and has too many people. And y'all too unwilling to take the bus.

LOTW
08-29-2011, 12:01 PM
[QUOTE=Ian Gills;311022 The UK accounted for just 1.7% in the same year.

That puts the UK somewhat on par with Somalia and is a sign of its irrelevance. It's percentage would be higher if its cars started more often.

Ian Gills
08-29-2011, 12:11 PM
Our cars are smaller because we tax gas for environmental reasons (we pay about $10 a gallon).

And we have public transport.

So you don't see individuals driving their F150s to work and back....three hours away!

You see small cars full of people. And buses. And trains.

LOTW
08-29-2011, 12:37 PM
Our cars are smaller because we tax gas for environmental reasons (we pay about $10 a gallon).

And we have public transport.

So you don't see individuals driving their F150s to work and back....three hours away!

You see small cars full of people. And buses. And trains.

Admit it, Ian. An F-150 would be great for hauling away tree branches right now, wouldn't it? What would be even better is a good old fashioned bonfire, but where I live the regulators have prohibited the same in urban areas. Maybe if you haul your branches to Ballvalve in an F-150 the little bonfire that he has will take care of them.

I am glad that you and BobL are intact. See, the beer worked.

Ian Gills
08-29-2011, 01:40 PM
Nope. I prefer to deal with tree branches where they sit. Cut them up and toss 'em in trash bags so they're off to the landfill.

The only time there is any excuse to drive an F150 is to haul drywall and even then there are a few tricks you can use to get drywall into a smaller vehicle.

BobL43
08-29-2011, 05:41 PM
Nope. I prefer to deal with tree branches where they sit. Cut them up and toss 'em in trash bags so they're off to the landfill.

The only time there is any excuse to drive an F150 is to haul drywall and even then there are a few tricks you can use to get drywall into a smaller vehicle.

yes you can cut the drywall into several small pieces or do what this guy did: http://www.thisisjuststupid.com/stupid-cars-trucks/overloaded-car-almost-made-it/ . a pickup truck does the job no problemo. The F150 is an American icon

Cookie
08-29-2011, 05:56 PM
Compost Ian. My husband and I built 2 of them. One was using the inside of the washer machine, putting a crank handle on it, putting it on a somewhat of a frame and it worked decent. The other is still standing, not well, but still usable, it is an older wooden one, using for the top, an old picnic table top. I make great dirt from grass clipping, smallish tree branches, fabric strips, food which won't draw rodents; here is a good site. I would like to see a tax deduction for those who buy the bins, etc.

http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/materials/organics/food/fd-house.htm

BobL43
08-29-2011, 06:19 PM
Cookie, how can you suggest composting Ian?:p he is still alive. In Europe, when I was there, I was told that bodies are only allowed to be buried for like 25 years or so, then they are dug up and the bones are placed in a bonehouse. How civilized and neat is that? That was in Switzerland, but they told me it is done in many countries in Europe.

Cookie
08-29-2011, 07:04 PM
I can dream can't I? ;) LOL.


Cookie, how can you suggest composting Ian?:p he is still alive. In Europe, when I was there, I was told that bodies are only allowed to be buried for like 25 years or so, then they are dug up and the bones are placed in a bonehouse. How civilized and neat is that? That was in Switzerland, but they told me it is done in many countries in Europe.

Cookie
08-29-2011, 07:11 PM
Will have to start on a bigger composter machine... :) but, maybe, bigger tax deduction.

Cookie
08-29-2011, 07:12 PM
I meant... for Ian to compost. I was speaking the King's English that is why it read like that.

Cookie
08-29-2011, 07:15 PM
So, you are saying, Bob, they reuse the graves? Oh, how disgusting is that, ;) a bone house? what are watching on tv? I will have to ask Ian, if this is true before he gets composted.

No matter what my boss says, I will refuse to sell, list, or appraise a bonehouse. Especially, if Ian is still composting in it.


Cookie, how can you suggest composting Ian?:p he is still alive. In Europe, when I was there, I was told that bodies are only allowed to be buried for like 25 years or so, then they are dug up and the bones are placed in a bonehouse. How civilized and neat is that? That was in Switzerland, but they told me it is done in many countries in Europe.

Cookie
08-29-2011, 07:30 PM
...and, I would recognize that shirt anywhere.

BobL43
08-30-2011, 04:55 AM
So, you are saying, Bob, they reuse the graves? Oh, how disgusting is that, ;) a bone house? what are watching on tv? I will have to ask Ian, if this is true before he gets composted.

No matter what my boss says, I will refuse to sell, list, or appraise a bonehouse. Especially, if Ian is still composting in it.

Yes, the told me they reuse the graves because of the limited land left. Looked like loads of countryside to me when I was there. I don't think the very rich or famous there get dug up, but I'm not sure.

BobL43
08-30-2011, 04:56 AM
...and, I would recognize that shirt anywhere.

Methinks you would:p

BobL43
08-30-2011, 08:23 AM
So, you are saying, Bob, they reuse the graves? Oh, how disgusting is that, ;) a bone house? what are watching on tv? I will have to ask Ian, if this is true before he gets composted.

No matter what my boss says, I will refuse to sell, list, or appraise a bonehouse. Especially, if Ian is still composting in it.
Oh, I looked it up and its even CREEPIER YET! They use the bones to build/decorate the bone houses. http://www.cultureledger.com/creepy-bone-houses-europe/

Cookie
08-30-2011, 08:40 AM
I don't know what to say, lol. This is a first.

Cookie
08-30-2011, 08:43 AM
Okay, ... this is legal?
I mean, it is like morally unethical and ghoulish.
Very Halloween like... lol.

BobL43
08-30-2011, 08:55 AM
I don't have any idea! Let's see what Ian an Ballvalve may be able to add to this. I'm off work today and tomorrow, but I will ask my friends in Switzerland if is still practiced. On one of my visits there in the mid 90's or so, one of my friends there told me about it and his tone of voice led me to believe it is still done in Switzerland at least.

Cookie
08-30-2011, 09:20 AM
See, if I was selling that ( which I would refuse to for no matter of $) I would write it up as:

A real charmer for those who delight in the after life. If dark shadows lurking in the still air, along with a faint smell of death hanging in the chilling darkness of the night is something which could entertain you, then this bone house is the place for you. Whispers of long-dead soldiers echoed with the sound of footsteps coming from nowhere are just one of the amenities this place has to offer. The flickering lights of the one of a kind man- made bone chandelier to the feelings of unease and forboding are perfect for those who like to experience life to a full circle. This is a true money-maker offering those a permanent residence when the time comes. Do not let this one elude you.

Cookie
08-30-2011, 09:24 AM
I don't have any idea! Let's see what Ian an Ballvalve may be able to add to this. I'm off work today and tomorrow, but I will ask my friends in Switzerland if is still practiced. On one of my visits there in the mid 90's or so, one of my friends there told me about it and his tone of voice led me to believe it is still done in Switzerland at least.

You mean Ian is going to read about composting him while alive? LOL.

I am outa here work is calling me. :)

BobL43
08-30-2011, 10:25 AM
I wonder if they use MLS in Europe? that would make good copy for the ad:eek:

Ian Gills
08-30-2011, 10:48 AM
Ok, if we can't touch your beloved F150 can we at least eliminate NASCAR and ban Country and Western music?

That should help reduce your CO2 emissions.

ballvalve
08-30-2011, 10:50 AM
Ian is right that Americans are idiots when it comes to the big truck to haul leaves to a dump. A circle of pickets, old branches or old wire will take a years worth of grasss and branches and a handful of worms will make it drop in height an inch a week.

And you dont have to buy it back in a bag for 4$ full of newspapers and pallets. And 3 chickens will eat every damn Cheerio your kid did not and that lousy steak from last night, and give you brekfast for free.

I have renters on my creek that rake for days and BAG the pine needles and leaves into 1.35$ Costco bags and ask if I can take it to my dumpster. Yeah right. It goes to a huge pile in the chicken coop and the bags go to the recycle area for filling with cans and plastic.

Its all so simplimatic, that maybe we need the Germans or English to come in and give such idiots lessons.

BobL43
08-30-2011, 11:12 AM
Ok, if we can't touch your beloved F150 can we at least eliminate NASCAR and ban Country and Western music?

That should help reduce your CO2 emissions.

totally out of the question Ian. Banning guns and NASCAR and CW Music? Wadda Ya Nuts?

Cookie
08-30-2011, 11:15 AM
I wonder if they use MLS in Europe? that would make good copy for the ad:eek:

I don't know. Something I will have to look into. I know I pay enough for it. Don't I write good prop descriptions? lol. Mine are always interesting... never, like others so bland and dry. I write the truth and spice it up. ;) I am smart because I will write the measurements of closets! if it has built in shoe racks, or a lighted make up light; women buy the houses.

...when the male says to me, " but I wanted a bigger garage and a place to put my tools" I ask him, while we are watching his wife examine with glee the closets, the lighted make-up mirror, "which would you rather have? see that smile everynight or... or have a place to put your tools everynight?"

With that, many times, the male while looking at me suspiciously says, " you are a very good salesman," no, "person, salesperson..." I tell him with my all american-girl smile.

BobL43
08-30-2011, 11:16 AM
Ian is right that Americans are idiots when it comes to the big truck to haul leaves to a dump. A circle of pickets, old branches or old wire will take a years worth of grasss and branches and a handful of worms will make it drop in height an inch a week.

And you dont have to buy it back in a bag for 4$ full of newspapers and pallets. And 3 chickens will eat every damn Cheerio your kid did not and that lousy steak from last night, and give you brekfast for free.

I have renters on my creek that rake for days and BAG the pine needles and leaves into 1.35$ Costco bags and ask if I can take it to my dumpster. Yeah right. It goes to a huge pile in the chicken coop and the bags go to the recycle area for filling with cans and plastic.

Its all so simplimatic, that maybe we need the Germans or English to come in and give such idiots lessons.

That still does not get the sheetrock and plywood and furniture moved. I compost grass and leaves, but when it gets too ripe sometimes, I am sorry I do. The is a town facility a few miles away where I can take as much compost as I want with my truck. At least i can get something for my real estate taxes.

Cookie
08-30-2011, 11:16 AM
How you feeling Ian?
my mother is calling me...

ballvalve
08-31-2011, 09:41 AM
Sheetrock composts very nicely especially if you have a backhoe. From the earth and back to the earth. Gypsum is mined and paper is grown. The binder is inert. I think greenboard just adds clay.

Some of the new stuff has fiberglas in it, so that might be problematic.

Grass only gets ripe if you dont add some old straw or dirt to the layers. And worms need some "space" - oyster shells, wadded up paper feed bags, even plastic, Then its worm heaven. One item I do buy is bagged steer manure. Layer with that - fantastic result. No turning or mixing need ever be done.

Goose bones seem to need about 10 years to compost. I'd give the English 25. And my new f-150 gets 18.8 MPG empty or overloaded.

LOTW
08-31-2011, 01:35 PM
I like the Ontario landfill which I utilize. Once there you separate the burnable materials from the nonburnables and the landfill burns it for you.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 05:10 PM
You got to watch sometimes where you dig. While digging a garden when we first moved in this house, we dug up asbestos. I don't know how long it was in there. No sense in telling you, the garden was placed somewhere else. So, I started digging in a new spot, this time I dug up a horse shoe. I told my husband and he said that means I will have good luck. I continued digging. I dug up another. I sat it aside the lucky one. Again, I told my husband. This time he didn't say I was lucky. He didn't speak until, I said, " wow, I got another one." This time, he said, " uh, cook, you are diggin up a horse."

I went inside, I was done. Too much in one day to find.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 05:36 PM
When he came in I asked him where he put the garden. He said, " between the hazardous material and the composted horse." Yeah, I told him, I could hardly wait for the first harvest. We offered everyone we knew vegetables and didn't get one taker.

The next season, we started digging on the other side of the yard area. Somehow, those veggies looked much better on the dinner table.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 05:43 PM
It could had been just a mental thing, but I saw a veggie growing in his first garden that even the animals wouldn't eat. It was like a cross between a watermelon, pumpkin and apple. We cut it from its vine and sat it in the middle of the yard looking at it. He asked me what I thought it was, I said, " dangerous" and, wild horses dead or alive won't make me it eat.

I said, ' it is in the dirt' and it is growing weird things. I don't go back there often.

BobL43
08-31-2011, 05:47 PM
**My** aging infrastructure is making it more difficult for me to sheetrock this bathroom I am re-doing than it would have 30 years ago:eek:
Got the ceiling and one wall done. The stuff is heavy for me. I tried to hire the only decent sheetrocker around here to do the work, but he is booked for a long time. that's what happens when you're good at your trade. I'll see if I can get him to do the spackling. I bought the new "light" weight sheetrock, so I guess this is the stuff ballvalve was talking aobut that has fiberglass and does not compost well? Never thought that sheetrock would compost and break down except the paper backings.
Always wanted a drywall screwgun, so this project gave me the excuse to buy one. why am I writing all this? Because at the moment I have nothing else to do, which does not happen too often.:p

Cookie
08-31-2011, 05:51 PM
There is story to my house. The neighbor across the road told me this was once a horse farm. Really? I said. She said, it is the oldest here, which explains why I got a well, etc. And, city water. But, my poor kids came home when we first bought this place and said, the kids on the bus was teasing them, saying, we bought a haunted house. Nice, I said. Just what I need more mouths to feed. Wait, they don't eat. Okay, they can stay. I asked my realtor about this, and she said, ' yeah, someone died in there, you want to know which room?" I don't think so...

In time, I found the room. I saw her. Everyone saw her. I did alittle research and she loved horses and she owned the horse farm sold them far and wide. Buried them here. So, far I have dug up about 8 horses in 12 years. I got lots of horseshoes.

I dig a hole to plant a bush, oops, a horse. At night when it is quiet I can sometimes hear the horses whinny. Do you believe this Ian? :)

Cookie
08-31-2011, 05:54 PM
Becareful if you bury the drywall because someday, someone, somewhere will want a garden and dig it up.

BobL43
08-31-2011, 06:02 PM
Becareful if you bury the drywall because someday, someone, somewhere will want a garden and dig it up.

I put the cuttoffs in the trash; it gets incinerated and the compacted ash goes into the landfill in another state.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 06:05 PM
Bob get a lift. I did my own kitchen ceiling using a lift.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 06:07 PM
I don't think it would be dangerous to dig up drywall, but, it might scare a person. They might think it is worse stuff like what I dug up.

That day I was digging and said, " hey, what's this stuff?" My husband came over saying, " oh, boy, leave it to you to find this," I said, " what is this stuff?" He said, " leave it go, I will take care of it, you go make tea..."

You are going to dismiss me? LOL... oh, no my friend, dear husband... now, I need to know.

He told me, and of course, I flipped out. For a second. Only. Then, made tea.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 06:10 PM
When people asked us how our garden grew, I told them, " like a malignancy

When people asked us, what we used for fertilizer since our veggies was so enormous, I told them, " hazardous waste material, asbestos."

They thought I was kidding.

BobL43
08-31-2011, 06:21 PM
Bob get a lift. I did my own kitchen ceiling using a lift.

The bathroom is so small, 7X7 feet, there is no room to maneuver a lift in there The total number of sheets is only 10. For the ceiling, I attached a ledger board to one wall, leaned a sheet on it, lifted the other end to the ceiling on a ladder, and my wife propped it up with a T bar I made up. Its just so tight, no room to move around. Putting in the Tongue and groove plywood subfloor was loads of fun too, as it also was just one sheet long by a little more than 1 1/2 sheets wide. It required good measuring and accurea cuts to get it right and to prepare it for gluing and screwing it down. Its fun anyway

Cookie
08-31-2011, 07:15 PM
My bath is small and was replaced in 05 when the floor fell in. Literally. Don't ask. So, the whole thing was gutted. I paid only 300 for the drywall man to do it, and he did a remarkable job. He wasn't fast, and he smoked like a chimney ( to which the kids was complaining) but, his work for the money was great. The only thing, I wanted the electrical box moved up another inch for code since the sink was higher and he said, he would, he could, but, he didn't. I didn't realize it until, everything was done. Eventually, I will have it moved. Bob, maybe, look into ( depending on how much is already done) getting someone just to hang it. It is easy ( to me not fun) to do the rest. My husband and I in the past did our entire first house. That is how I know how to do it, because he gutted the old kitchen and then, flew overseas, leaving me with firestuds. I figured it out. Did I mention I was then 8 months pregnant? lol. I got the walls up and the floor laid before the baby decided to help.

BobL43
08-31-2011, 07:28 PM
My bath is small and was replaced in 05 when the floor fell in. Literally. Don't ask. So, the whole thing was gutted. I paid only 300 for the drywall man to do it, and he did a remarkable job. He wasn't fast, and he smoked like a chimney ( to which the kids was complaining) but, his work for the money was great. The only thing, I wanted the electrical box moved up another inch for code since the sink was higher and he said, he would, he could, but, he didn't. I didn't realize it until, everything was done. Eventually, I will have it moved. Bob, maybe, look into ( depending on how much is already done) getting someone just to hang it. It is easy ( to me not fun) to do the rest. My husband and I in the past did our entire first house. That is how I know how to do it, because he gutted the old kitchen and then, flew overseas, leaving me with firestuds. I figured it out. Did I mention I was then 8 months pregnant? lol. I got the walls up and the floor laid before the baby decided to help.

This is the 3rd bathroom complete gut and redo for me, plus I did a total gut and redo of the kitchen it 2008. Did everything including electrical, plumbing and tile work. All came out beautiful and done to code. can't get some handyman to put up sheetrock for me. Its got to be done right to my standards. I'm pretty fussy. the guy I wanted to do it is fantastic at it, but too busy right now. Being older makes it more difficuolt and takes longer. I enjoy looking at it afterwards and take pride in it. I also hauled the stuff From Lowes to the house and carried it in.

Gary in NJ
08-31-2011, 07:46 PM
The stuff is heavy for me.

Rent a drywall lift for the day. The best $50 you'll ever spend.

BobL43
08-31-2011, 07:54 PM
Rent a drywall lift for the day. The best $50 you'll ever spend.

Thanks, the ceiling is already up. Read my post #52. The walls are much easier to do.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:13 PM
Now Bob, I carried that 1/2 in. drywall on my head 8 months pregnant, LOL... quit yer complaining, ;)
I already told you, you are a young whipper-snapper!



This is the 3rd bathroom complete gut and redo for me, plus I did a total gut and redo of the kitchen it 2008. Did everything including electrical, plumbing and tile work. All came out beautiful and done to code. can't get some handyman to put up sheetrock for me. Its got to be done right to my standards. I'm pretty fussy. the guy I wanted to do it is fantastic at it, but too busy right now. Being older makes it more difficuolt and takes longer. I enjoy looking at it afterwards and take pride in it. I also hauled the stuff From Lowes to the house and carried it in.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:15 PM
I carried it 2 miles, on foot, in the winter snow...

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:16 PM
then, went by a tree and gave birth. :) never whimpered. Carried the child and the drywall 2 miles back to home, in the snow, barefoot.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:17 PM
This is true, Ian. ;)

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:21 PM
Part of it anyway. :)

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:38 PM
Look what this man's garden grew! I want one of those gardens.

.....Man finds $150,000 in garden
..By Claudine Zap

Wayne Sabaj may have one of the greenest thumbs around. The unemployed Illinois man wandered into his garden and unearthed a crop of cash -- about $150,000 worth.

"Now what do I do with this?" Sabaj wondered.


As the old saw goes, money doesn't grow on trees. But sometimes it sprouts up in the garden. An unemployed man in northern Illinois was out working in his backyard when he came across some serious green: bags filled with $150,000 cash.

Wayne Sabaj was headed to pick some broccoli to go with his roast. The carpenter spotted duffel bags that looked like trash by the peppers -- but they turned out to be a cash crop: stacks of $20 bills that added up to about $150,000. The 49-year-old, who is living with his dad, did not exactly jump for joy.

The out-of-work carpenter told ABC7, "I could really use this money." But with this money comes trouble. He explained, "With my luck, it would be bank robbery and I'd get caught and say I'd robbed a bank."

So the honest man with money troubles alerted the police to his amazing backyard treasure.


For now, police haven't a clue to where the cash came from: There are no reported burglaries in the area, and no banks have been robbed.

Then there was the concern that whoever left the money behind would be back, and that's a problem the Sabaj men would rather have solved by the police.

If nobody comes forward to legitimately claim the cash, there may be a happy ending for the man tending his garden: Police will help figure out if Sabaj can keep the money. The carpenter has retained an attorney just in case.

For now, the cash is in custody with the country sheriff, who left behind a card on the lawn where Sabaj found the bags, bearing the simple message, please call.

Cookie
08-31-2011, 08:44 PM
I wonder what is in his compost pile. :)

BobL43
09-01-2011, 03:50 AM
Now Bob, I carried that 1/2 in. drywall on my head 8 months pregnant, LOL... quit yer complaining, ;)
I already told you, you are a young whipper-snapper!

Ok Cookie, you win! you ARE crazier than me!:eek:

BobL43
09-01-2011, 05:18 AM
Rent a drywall lift for the day. The best $50 you'll ever spend.

Or I could do what this guy did, but its bigger than the room I'm doing:D:D:D:eek:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkrRblKLvJw

BobL43
09-01-2011, 07:07 AM
then, went by a tree and gave birth. :) never whimpered. Carried the child and the drywall 2 miles back to home, in the snow, barefoot.

You are quite the pioneer lady Cookie. and also a very good story teller. I guess that comes in handy selling real estate.

I like Ian's current new thread about hauling beer interstate.

Cookie
09-01-2011, 07:10 AM
Very cool... indeed.

Cookie
09-01-2011, 07:17 AM
I call myself the pathfinder.

I tell wonderful stories. :) in all of them, their is always an element of truth but, you just got to know me to know where it is.

I will have to check out Ian's new thread maybe, add to it. ;)


You are quite the pioneer lady Cookie. and also a very good story teller. I guess that comes in handy selling real estate.

I like Ian's current new thread about hauling beer interstate.