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View Full Version : Can I use threaded pvc adapter for future modification?



diyfun
06-13-2011, 07:55 PM
I am going to cut my horizontal branch from a vertical 2-3" wye for a new counter sink drain. I am thinking use two threaded adapters (see the photo please) in the horizontal line after the vertical wye for future modification. is it allowed?

hj
06-14-2011, 05:47 AM
It is NOT the best idea, because there will be a "ridge" between the two threads, and if it DOES need modification some day, it is almost easier to just cut the pipe and start over with glued joints.

trickydick
01-29-2012, 11:50 AM
I am going to cut my horizontal branch from a vertical 2-3" wye for a new counter sink drain. I am thinking use two threaded adapters (see the photo please) in the horizontal line after the vertical wye for future modification. is it allowed?

Would this be a problem then if replacing a clean-out plug with a male adapter to extend my 4" drain? I'd have an awfu lot of 4" fittings to replace if I had to start over. Thanks

hj
01-29-2012, 01:16 PM
Again, it would not be the best way to do it, and whether you can even use the cleanout depends on whether it is a cleanout tee, or a plugged female adapter.

trickydick
01-29-2012, 04:25 PM
Again, it would not be the best way to do it, and whether you can even use the cleanout depends on whether it is a cleanout tee, or a plugged female adapter.

Sorry hj and diyfun, I ment my reply for hj's original response, but it went to the wrong place. But in reponse to hj's above reply, the clean out is on a female adapter. I was thinking of wrapping a hose clamp around the hub to protect it from the male adapter; shouldn't the male adapter work ok considering the fact that the clean-out could be removed at times to "clean-out" and replaced to continue functioning as intended?

jadnashua
01-29-2012, 06:45 PM
Female pvc fittings can split eventually if you overtighten the male or there's any long-term tension on it; or, it could last forever. Safer to cut it off and use a coupling.

trickydick
01-29-2012, 08:01 PM
Female pvc fittings can split eventually if you overtighten the male or there's any long-term tension on it; or, it could last forever. Safer to cut it off and use a coupling.

Problem is when originally installed, the female hub was butted smack-up against the wye hub leaving no room to cut-off and attach a coupling; the other end of the wye is smack-up against another wye that connedts the main stack; I need to extend this 4" line. Check-out the aerial shot that I included. (sorry about the double photo)1537915379

Hackney plumbing
01-29-2012, 08:13 PM
Cut the female adapter off even with the hub and use a pasco 3" ram bit aka fitting saver. It will remove the rest of the adapter thats solvent welded in the wye. Then simply solvent weld your new pipe in.

dlarrivee
01-29-2012, 08:19 PM
I'm not sure how else you expected the clean-out to be installed into the wye...

It was never going to be installed in a way that would allow you to cut the threaded bit off and attach a coupling.

Instead of buying a fancy tool, just replace the whole wye...

Hackney plumbing
01-29-2012, 08:25 PM
I'm not sure how else you expected the clean-out to be installed into the wye...

It was never going to be installed in a way that would allow you to cut the threaded bit off and attach a coupling.

Instead of buying a fancy tool, just replace the whole wye...

Yeah I'm against doing things the easy way too......nevermind a tool designed to do whats being asked. Just replumb the lower half of the house.

dlarrivee
01-29-2012, 08:29 PM
Why would someone buy a specialty tool that they will only use once, when they could simply cut and glue in a new fitting?

If you're a pro and you expect to use a tool 100 times it makes sense.

Is replacing a wye really a large task for you?

Hackney plumbing
01-29-2012, 08:32 PM
Why would someone buy a specialty tool that they will only use once, when they could simply cut and glue in a new fitting?

If you're a pro and you expect to use a tool 100 times it makes sense.

Is replacing a wye really a large task for you?

From the pic its hub to hub with a combo. Whats the price of a 3x2 wye and a 3" combo and a couple couplings?

dlarrivee
01-29-2012, 08:36 PM
That depends on where you live, and how far away the specialty one-time-use tool is as well as the premium you might be charged for it.

I could have done this in the time between the photo above being posted and your last comment, the fittings are easy to come by and cheap enough.

Hackney plumbing
01-29-2012, 08:50 PM
That depends on where you live, and how far away the specialty one-time-use tool is as well as the premium you might be charged for it.

I could have done this in the time between the photo above being posted and your last comment, the fittings are easy to come by and cheap enough.

I dont recall him asking the cheapest way or the easiest way for you to do it. I think he wants to know how the easiest way for him to do the job without cutting the fittings out.

dlarrivee
01-29-2012, 09:13 PM
Well in that case the easiest way is to hire a plumber from Florida.

trickydick
01-30-2012, 03:35 PM
Ok thanks for all of the advise, but let me clear-up a few things.These fittings are all 4"-do they make a 4" fitting saver? Secondly, that 4x2x4 wye butts-up to a 4x4x4 wye; you can see the vertical stack going down in bottom part of the photo; what might a 4" pasco fitting saver cost? Why wouldn't the hose clamp help keep the hub from splitting? I would assume glueing in the adapter is out of the question

Hackney plumbing
01-30-2012, 04:44 PM
Well in that case the easiest way is to hire a plumber from Florida.

I think he lives in N.H. It probably would be better to get a local plumber in his area.


Ok thanks for all of the advise, but let me clear-up a few things.These fittings are all 4"-do they make a 4" fitting saver? Secondly, that 4x2x4 wye butts-up to a 4x4x4 wye; you can see the vertical stack going down in bottom part of the photo; what might a 4" pasco fitting saver cost? Why wouldn't the hose clamp help keep the hub from splitting? I would assume glueing in the adapter is out of the question

Yes a 4" fitting saver is made by pasco. I think they cost me around 40.00. 4" fittings are not cheap. The hose clamps may keep it from splitting....then again it may not.


You could always throw some pvc solvent on the male and female threads and screw them together quickly and let it set for a day or so. LOL

dlarrivee
01-30-2012, 05:22 PM
If you aren't in a hurry, get that fitting saver, or get the better version the "pipe-hawg"...

They definitely make them in 4", and when you're done with it, Hackney will buy it from you.

trickydick
01-30-2012, 08:03 PM
Thanks for all the help, didn't mean to cause such a fus; just looking for some friendly advise. you see I had alk my fittings and pipe ready to go and then I found this other info on the problems others have had with possible hub splittings. I think at this point I'll see what happens by using clamps on the hub and adapter; if it splits, then I can make the choice of using the pasco or replacing (2) 4" wyes. That being the case, any tips on using a fitting saver or is it self explanatory? Thanks again in advance

jadnashua
01-30-2012, 09:03 PM
http://www.pascospecialty.com/catalog/PASCO_CATALOG_C.pdf it's tapered so as long as you keep the thing straight, and have a powerful enough drill motor, it just reams out the pipe, leaving a socket you can then stick a new piece of pipe into. A threaded hub will have a lip that could be a place for crud to get caught. A straight pipe/coupling done properly, is fairly smooth with the ends aligned with no threads or other rough edges to catch things. Other companies make simlar tools. A glued joint ends up being essentially double thickness, welded together. A threaded joint relies on the strength of the somewhat thinner single layer. A solvent welded joint is a lot stronger and smoother going through it.

kreemoweet
01-30-2012, 10:12 PM
The Pasco tools are rude and crude compared to these guys: http://rectorseal.com/Golden-Pipe-Shredder.php

trickydick
01-31-2012, 03:13 PM
http://www.pascospecialty.com/catalog/PASCO_CATALOG_C.pdf it's tapered so as long as you keep the thing straight, and have a powerful enough drill motor, it just reams out the pipe, leaving a socket you can then stick a new piece of pipe into. A threaded hub will have a lip that could be a place for crud to get caught. A straight pipe/coupling done properly, is fairly smooth with the ends aligned with no threads or other rough edges to catch things. Other companies make simlar tools. A glued joint ends up being essentially double thickness, welded together. A threaded joint relies on the strength of the somewhat thinner single layer. A solvent welded joint is a lot stronger and smoother going through it.

Thanks for the advise. I need to reuse that hub in order to extend the 4" line about 6ft. to connet a 2" standpipe and a 1 1/2" drain for my laundry tub; I don't think I should have too much trouble with things collecting at the "lip"

trickydick
01-31-2012, 03:31 PM
The Pasco tools are rude and crude compared to these guys: http://rectorseal.com/Golden-Pipe-Shredder.php

Thanks for the help. I agree, that pasco tool looks like you have to have a steady hand or you could ruin the fitting in no time. I saw a tool similar to what yoy posted; seems the inside pipe diameter helps guide it along. The price for this puppy is around $68, and that was a discounted price. Think for now I'll stick with my alternate plan and reuse the threaded hub with male adapter. maybe I could rent one; will check with Taylor or another place someone may know of. Thanks

Hackney plumbing
01-31-2012, 04:08 PM
The straighter the cut at the fitting the easier the pasco is to use. just apply a small amount of forward pressure and it guides itself and cuts the pipe out. It's easy. I had the same concerns as you do the first time I used it.

trickydick
02-14-2012, 06:49 PM
http://www.pascospecialty.com/catalog/PASCO_CATALOG_C.pdf it's tapered so as long as you keep the thing straight, and have a powerful enough drill motor, it just reams out the pipe, leaving a socket you can then stick a new piece of pipe into. A threaded hub will have a lip that could be a place for crud to get caught. A straight pipe/coupling done properly, is fairly smooth with the ends aligned with no threads or other rough edges to catch things. Other companies make simlar tools. A glued joint ends up being essentially double thickness, welded together. A threaded joint relies on the strength of the somewhat thinner single layer. A solvent welded joint is a lot stronger and smoother going through it. Would the residual glue have to be removed with cleaner before reuse? I've got a 1/2in drill, but woould the rpm matter? It's about 50yrs old and the old girl might not have much left. Thanx

jadnashua
02-14-2012, 06:53 PM
If you use any one of the socket reamer tools, it leaves a clean, properly sized socket to enable a new piece of pipe to be glued in. Well, I doubt it tapers the socket like it was in the original, but with good coverage of the cement, it should make a fine seal.

Plumber111
02-14-2012, 07:18 PM
I keep reading his first post and getting confused. "cut my horizontal branch from a vertical 2-3" wye". Then I see the picture and go crosseyed.

Couldn't they cut to the outlet coupling of the hub, cut across the hub to the pipe, heat and peel the outlet hub away? Done it, but not often. Then take off from there. Doesn't have to buy the hub drill then. And if they fail, then they get the hub drill.

Wish there were more pics of the line. Might be a place to put in another WYE. But again, I'm kind of confused by the wording.

This is why I try real hard to avoid fitting to fitting.

jadnashua
02-14-2012, 08:49 PM
Peeling a pipe out of a hub sometimes works, but it's easy to mess things up too much to then glue in a new pipe, especially if you haven't done it before. The reamer tool should always work. The cement melts the plstic on both parts, and essentially, they become 'one'. It is probably the weakest link, and may split there, but it may not.

Hackney plumbing
02-14-2012, 09:21 PM
Peeling a pipe out of a hub sometimes works, but it's easy to mess things up too much to then glue in a new pipe, especially if you haven't done it before. The reamer tool should always work. The cement melts the plstic on both parts, and essentially, they become 'one'. It is probably the weakest link, and may split there, but it may not.

That method relies some what on the fact that most people do not assemble pvc properly. I agree with you.