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View Full Version : frost free hose bibs - quality brand?



dripdrip
05-15-2011, 06:06 PM
Maybe I'm wrong, but a lot of frost free hose bibs seem to be of questionable quality. Last year I replaced one with one I got at the local plumbing supply house.
I couldn't see the joint so I tightened it pretty hard. Attached is a photo.
I'm usually pretty careful and almost never break things during tightening.

Anyway, since it still worked I decided to leave it be. Now it is acting funny.

So what do you guys think is a good brand?

BTW this was a "PurePro" made in China.

Thanks,

DD

jadnashua
05-15-2011, 06:14 PM
Look at Woodford. They have some nice stuff. Most require you to remove the hose to allow them to drain, but they have some models that will drain, regardless. Handy for those transition seasons when you may want the hose, but forget and it freezes. They also have one where you can plumb both hot and cold to it, so it has some additional potential uses such as a remote shower, washing the car or kids off with warm water rather than cold. Moen also make a silcock that gets both hot and cold, or just cold.

cacher_chick
05-15-2011, 06:16 PM
Jim beat me to it. Woodford is the only good stuff left I think.

http://www.woodfordmfg.com/woodford/WFDIndex.html

Redwood
05-15-2011, 06:17 PM
That twist in the tube would make it work funny and yes you did tighten it hard...

Way too hard!

There aren't any good brands made in China...
Doesn't most of their population still lack running water in their homes?

One of the forum members here is from Prier and they make a good one but still you don't want to over tight them either...

Woodford is also good...

Gary Swart
05-15-2011, 06:52 PM
I think what you did was use the wrong technique to install the valve. Usually, the inlet end of the valve screws into a female adapter that is screwed into a tee in the supply line. The installation requires 2 wrenches. One wrench holds the adapter to prevent it from twisting the supply line, and the second wrench fits on the inside end of the valve. Force should not be applied to the exterior part of the valve (where the handle is) because that can easily result in a twisted pipe such as you picture. Removal is done the same way except in reverse. While I agree with the previous comments about Chinese valves, I don't think the Chinese should be blamed for this particular problem. You have to do all of the work inside the house where the valve meets the supply line.