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twinbro2
10-13-2005, 12:54 AM
When you work on your own house, do you need to get the building inspector to come look at your work? For example, if you are replacing one existing supply line? What if you replumb the whole house?

Also, do you need to get any kind of plumbing or contractors license to work on your own house? Thanks!

thezster
10-13-2005, 06:19 AM
While permit requirements vary from region to region, typically you need a permit (and the subsequent inspections) for any plumbing/electrical/HVAC/Structural work. Some regions go even deeper, requiring things like drywall screw inspections/insulation inspections for new walls.

Licensing requirements will also vary from region to region. Contact your local permit office for details. They're usually pretty helpful in my experience.... and will help you get the job done right with proper info for your area.

finnegan
10-13-2005, 07:25 AM
Generally speaking, in NJ you do not need a license to work on your own single family house that you live in, or will be living in after renovations. But even here we have some exceptions. The final connections on teh high pressure line on an AC unit have to be brazed by a licensed installer. Some cities and states have some peculiar requriements. Your local building department can probably help you out with this.

hj
10-13-2005, 07:38 AM
Every area has its own requirements for inspections and licenses. Replacing a water heater, for example, almost always requires a permit and inspection. Replacing a faucet may, or may not, require an inspection depending on where you live. Many places will allow a homeowner to do his own work, providing he does it all himself, without hiring any help to do it. But it still requires a permit and inspection to verify that the work was done to the required standards.

jimbo
10-13-2005, 07:49 AM
BUT, if you live in the people's republic of Massachusetts, you are not allowed to do ANY plumbing work in your own house. The fine is $2500.

By the way, up until a few years ago, motorists were not allowed to pump their own gas at the station. Had to have the attendant come out and do it. I think they finally changed that around the year 2000. Figured they might as well get into the 21st century, since they had SKIPPED the 20th!

Marc
10-13-2005, 08:56 AM
BUT, if you live in the people's republic of Massachusetts, you are not allowed to do ANY plumbing work in your own house. The fine is $2500.


Guess I owe about $10k then!

Odd since the local home depot gives workshops on how to do it all yourself.

Vitaliy
10-13-2005, 09:05 AM
Jimbo,

I live in Massachusetts since September 1992.
All gas stations had ‘self service” pumps and only few had “full service”
(i.e. assisted) pumps in ADDITION to “self service”.

Are you saying in Massachusetts I cannot replace even toilet supply
line myself? If this still a case (actually I have no idea) stores like HD
should not even be allowed in MA. Or whoever bought something from
plumbing department should be automatically fined at registry
(just in case not to miss any DIY).

- Vitaliy

slb
10-13-2005, 11:17 AM
By the way, up until a few years ago, motorists were not allowed to pump their own gas at the station. Had to have the attendant come out and do it.

FYI, it was (may still be) like this in Oregon when I was there last year.

-Steve

sulconst2
10-13-2005, 02:20 PM
i always equated this with "you have the right to bear arms, you have the right to work on your own home". you still need permits as required but in jersey like finnigan said, you can sign off on plumbing and electric as an exempt applicant (homeowner). inspectors hate this. they bust balls. not a bad thing seeing "some" of the homes i remodeled with previous homeowners trying to do work. i agree with the ac lines. even though i installed unit myself the inspector wanted liscense # from my ac guy. must be something new. i also think if you do this work you are supposed to stay in the home for 2 years. you cant flip it.

jimbo
10-13-2005, 04:41 PM
Well I only get back for clams every few years; in Oct. of 2004 the station in my home town was still doing all the pumping, but it is a small town and a small station. In 1999, I remember being hassled at a station near Logan as I jumped out and grabbed the nozzle and started pumping!

I too have wondered about the inconsistency of HD being there. I guess is it just a case of they must be looking the other way.

I believe you are allowed to change faucet washers. I don't know about a supply line. I know if you buy an undersink water filer from HD, the installation instructions mention that in MA it must be installed by a licensed plumber.

Give me a large clam plate and a pound-and-a-quarter lobster and fergetaboutit!

Lakee911
10-13-2005, 05:38 PM
Three letters: F MA!

;)

sulconst2
10-13-2005, 06:23 PM
Three letters: F MA!

;)

2cd the motion!

plumguy
10-13-2005, 07:35 PM
and stay out!! :D

finnegan
10-13-2005, 07:42 PM
NJ does not allow self serve gas stations. Everything is full service. However, full service in NJ is the same price as self service in other states. Strange.

twinbro2
10-14-2005, 09:03 AM
thanks for the info... I will check with the local building code people... A (competent) homeowner ought to be able to do some work on his/her own house. On the other hand, there are certain things in plumbing that seem simple but aren't.

P.S. In SC there are almost no "full service" stations anymore.

trinculo54
10-14-2005, 12:48 PM
It has been my experience that the town/city can decided what you can and can't do in your house, in Poughkeepsie New York for example you can work on your own plumbing, however if you are connected to city/town water and or sewer they then require you to have a licensed plumber do the major work, IE main sewer lines etc...However if you have a well and a septic tank you can do all of the work yourself. For minor work that is connected to the city/town supplies, like changing a faucet or replacing a sink they require you to take a class and show certification before can get the permit...it's a pretty basic class that costs around $45 and lasts for about 2hours.

Such a strange system!

twinbro2
10-19-2005, 11:29 AM
I called our building office, and in my county you can work on your own residence but you need to get a building permit and also need to have work inspected before any of it is covered up.

toolaholic
10-19-2005, 06:24 PM
just came back from 2 weeks on the cape. even visited your old town ,west Newbury, what a beautiful place my grandkids are growing up in.

you can pump your own gas now. i find it interisting to see vacuum breakers on water heaters. cape is still great . be well kevin

Kelly
11-07-2005, 04:19 PM
Isn't the People's Republic of Massachusetts one of them places still likes to use lead and copper shower pans, too? :rolleyes:


But that's not why I called. Please to settle discussion from over yonder to the Tile Your World forums:

Is the homeowner allowed to pull plumbing permits and do plumbing work in her own house in the state of Hawaii?

Thanks, as always,
CX

alhurley
11-07-2005, 04:26 PM
......Is the homeowner allowed to pull plumbing permits and do plumbing work in her own house in the state of Hawaii?......
I think I just saw somewhere that the answer is a resounding "NO!"

btw - is it just me, or is there a correlation here between the state's controlling political party and permit rules? :rolleyes:

Kelly
11-07-2005, 07:20 PM
Don't think I can sign on to that theory, Al. The Independent Republic of Texas was run entirely by Democrats for about a gazillion years until just recently. Permit rules are very lax here compared to many other states, and have been so forever, best I can tell.

Bubba just don't like to be tole what he can/can't do on his ranch, eh? :D

alhurley
11-08-2005, 10:56 AM
Don't think I can sign on to that theory, Al. The Independent Republic of Texas was run entirely by Democrats for about a gazillion years until just recently. Permit rules are very lax here compared to many other states, and have been so forever, best I can tell. Sure, and the same can be said about just about every state south of the Mason-Dixon, right? (I know this is a little OT, but we are talking about permitting in general, eh?)

Correlations are about trends, and you have to look at many factors lest you correlate the wrong thing. With regard to Texas and the South in general, I'll borrow a page from my Democrat friends (I have several) and point out the obvious - those folks were Southern Democrats! There's no way you can compare the Dems who ran any Southern state to those in the Northeast or far West. (could Teddy even win dog catcher in TX?) And there are other factors - like predominantly urban vs rural/farm/ranch and so on.

Once you correlate enough similar attributes (ie, 'apples-to-apples') you see obvious trends. There is far more regulation - of all sorts - in NJ, MA, CA, HI, WA than in KS, AL, TX, CO, AZ. Just ask Terry how the Seattle folks are taking to the new laws regulating the size of your house as a percent of your lot size. :)

-art-

jimbo
11-08-2005, 04:13 PM
"the new laws regulating the size of your house as a percent of your lot size"

It's called "floor area ratio" and is the latest buzzword in the planning world, along with "mass and scale" , "building articulation" and "walkability".