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View Full Version : tub spout just spins - can't remove and leaks



brucewe
06-27-2010, 09:38 PM
I have a Delta tub/shower set and when installing the tub spout something popped and now the spout just spins and can't remove it. This would not be a problem except it leaks badly when shower diverter is pulled up and the water goes through the holes for the copper stem. Does anyone have any ideas on how to remove the spout other than cutting it apart?

here is a picture of the tub spout I have and the delta model # is RP42915RB.

Terry
06-27-2010, 10:15 PM
Do you have a picture or part number?
The Delta spout I install couldn't spin and spin.

jimbo
06-28-2010, 06:27 AM
Did you install the Delta type where a large ( about 1" diam) fitting is attached to the pipe, then the spout screws onto that fitting? The adapter attachement to the copper may have come loose. What was the Deltat part number for the spout? Pics?

hj
06-28-2010, 07:04 AM
As stated, the Delta spouts I also use, attach to an adapter which either screws onto a pipe or solders to a copper tube. NEITHER of these can "come loose" and spin without coming free. In fact, when attaching it there should be no torque which could have broken something loose. We need a picture of your spout to verify that it is actually a Delta spout.

jadnashua
06-28-2010, 03:45 PM
If you had a push-on version of the spout and you tried to unscrew it, you broke it. If it is this type, there is a setscrew that holds the sealing section of the spout that you'll have to get aligned with the notch on the bottom. If you loosen that, you can then probably pull it off.

brucewe
06-29-2010, 05:52 AM
delta model number RP42915RB - here is pic. I was screwing it onto a copper pipe with the fitting soldered to the end. My thought is that the solder broke and the fitting it just spinning on the pipe now and I don't know how to get it off other than start cutting it apart. I don't want to have to cut the copper pipe and welcome all ideas.

brucewe
06-29-2010, 03:41 PM
As stated, the Delta spouts I also use, attach to an adapter which either screws onto a pipe or solders to a copper tube. NEITHER of these can "come loose" and spin without coming free. In fact, when attaching it there should be no torque which could have broken something loose. We need a picture of your spout to verify that it is actually a Delta spout.

delta model number RP42915RB - here is pic. I was screwing it onto a copper pipe with the fitting soldered to the end. My thought is that the solder broke and the fitting it just spinning on the pipe now and I don't know how to get it off other than start cutting it apart. I don't want to have to cut the copper pipe and welcome all ideas.

hj
06-30-2010, 06:18 AM
IF the solder joint broke and is turning, then you should be able to remove it by pulling on it at the same time. The specifications for the spout do not say whether it is the "adjust to wall" model or not. If your spout had the thread integral with the spout, it should remove, although the solder joint would have to have been REALLY bad to come loose from tightening it. IF it has the adjust to wall bushing, (and I thought that was the only kind Delta made these days), you should have tighted it onto the pipe before screwing the spout on.

jadnashua
06-30-2010, 09:01 AM
If you had a cold solder joint (i.e., one that you didn't heat things enough for the solder to flow properly), you may have a glob adheared well to the end of the pipe. You won't get it to come off over that as it would act like a stop. So, if vigorous turning while pulling won't release it, you'll have to cut it off and then patch things back. If the stub sticking out of the wall was a nipple (threaded), then it should unscrew. Hopefully, you've got or can make access to the rear of this so you can fix it without tearing up the finished wall in the tub area.

You might call Delta, but I'm not sure they can offer any other suggestions. Because that adapter piece of brass is fairly heavy, it takes a bit longer to reach proper soldering temperature (verses a copper to copper typical joint). Regardless, if done properly, the solder would visibly flow once it got hot enough after the torch flame was removed. Anything melting in the flame is suspect, as it then cools almost instantly without flowing into the fitting.