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ip1275
09-22-2005, 12:51 PM
Hello,
I read in one of Terry's old bulletin replies that one can "purchase a self contained vent system for your dryer. This system mounts to the wall close to your dryer. You the fill it with water and connect the hose. It not only contains the excess lint, but also helps to control the condensation."

I searched on Lowes and Home Depot's websites but couldn't find any such system. Would anyone be able to tell me whether this is separate venting system that works with a regular electric dryer, or this is a specific type of dryer that has a built-in, self-contained venting system? Could anyone recommend a specific brand or model? Does a self-vented dryer perform well enough?

I am planning on installing a stackable washer/dryer unit in my open kitchen, built into the cabinet, but all the ones I find require a proper ventilation duct to the outside, which is not possible in my small apartment. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Cheryl

jimbo
09-22-2005, 02:10 PM
I believe he was referring to what is usually called a lint trap. It is a rectangular tray about 5" deep. Partly filled with water; the dryer hose is connected blowing straight down. The water catches most of the lint and some of the moist air. I don't think it is ideal for a kitchen, but in a pinch if you must..............

This item is readily available at most hardware and box stores. They call it "lint trap".

Gary Swart
09-22-2005, 03:13 PM
The lint trap may work fine for catching and holding lint, but you will have serious moist problems if you do not vent the dryer. All the water that is removed from the clothes while drying has to go somewhere, and if not vented outside, you kitchen will be a sauna. You say that venting is impossible, and it very well may be, but you will not be happy with the dryer venting into your home's interior.

Dunbar Plumbing
09-22-2005, 05:06 PM
It is also a gross smell when you walk into a home and it smells like drying clothes.

finnegan
09-22-2005, 07:41 PM
If you have not yet purchased your dryer, you can purchase a model which does not require a vent. They are more expensive, but perhaps a better solution for you. Not every brand makes a ventless model, but I believe LG does.

DerSchuhmacher
01-22-2007, 11:28 AM
Hi,

I know this is a little late but those are called indoor dryer vents and I am trying to decide if I want to buy one. I see there is much controversy about the humidity and lint in the air.

I talked to Menard's and they sell them for under $10. The reason I am interested in one is because I live in an apartment and cannot run a vent outside. I have only found 1 so far that is about $30 that seems to be better made than any others but I am still not convinced yet.

I was also looking into a ventless washer/dryer that is sold by several companies like LG, Summit, Haier, etc., but I have heard nothing but disgust for the Haier products and I am trying to find a brand that people actually love!

Bob NH
01-22-2007, 11:42 AM
People pay a lot for humidifiers to use in the winter. If you can use a lint trap and vent an electric dryer inside during the winter, especially to a garage or basement area, you can save heat and add good humidity.

In the summer, you should vent it outside to save on A/C costs.

You can use a solar dryer in the summer, and even in the winter if it isn't snowing. My solar dryer has saved a lot of electricity and requires little maintenance.

Outdoor-dried sheets and pillowcases are a real treat, especially for the first night.

leejosepho
01-22-2007, 01:29 PM
It is also a gross smell when you walk into a home and it smells like drying clothes.

Had they first been washed?

DonnyO
07-08-2007, 11:41 AM
It is not as good as venting to the outside, but I got mine at Home Depot. Lowes does not carry it.

Here is an online link. Please remember you can only use it with an electric dryer. Gas dryers (as you know) must be vented to the outside.

http://www.improvementscatalog.com/home/improvements/75991-indoor-dryer-vent.html

Best wishes,

Don

leejosepho
07-08-2007, 07:20 PM
People pay a lot for humidifiers to use in the winter. If you can use a lint trap and vent an electric dryer inside during the winter, especially to a garage or basement area, you can save heat and add good humidity.

During the colder months, I disconnect the line going outside and vent our electric dryer through a pair of panty hose hanging in the basement.

GrumpyPlumber
07-08-2007, 08:47 PM
During the colder months, I disconnect the line going outside and vent our electric dryer through a pair of panty hose hanging in the basement.

Is your wife aware of this?

leejosepho
07-09-2007, 04:23 AM
She just now said it is funny to watch those "legs" flap around down there. Actually, though, they just hang there limp and vibrate a bit.

For folks who have septic systems, panty hose can also serve as a great lint filter on the end of a washing machine's discharge hose hanging on the edge of a utility sink.

Mikey
07-12-2007, 04:04 PM
A neighbor has purchased a Bosch ventless dryer, but it's not installed yet. If you can wait a few months, I can give you a report :D . I'm not optimistic for the reasons quoted above, but Bosch generally does a superb job.

jadnashua
07-12-2007, 04:16 PM
I really don't see venting any dryer inside the house, regardless of the season or location. There is almost always some small remnants of bleach, detergent, and softener in the gasses, and the huge shot of added moisture is rarely great for the structure, even in the winter.

If the Bosch unit has some sort of condensing unit to run the moisture down the drain, it must use a bunch of extra energy (plus you'd have to run a drain or at least a condensate line to one)...moisture just doesn't come out of the hot air all that easily - you'd need some way to cool it off.

Also note that any chlorine that might get in the air that is then used by any other combustion device in the house (gas dryer, stove, furnace) may not last as long because the chlorine combines in the heat of combustion and moisture to produce acid which can ruin them way before their time.

GrumpyPlumber
07-12-2007, 05:06 PM
A neighbor has purchased a Bosch ventless dryer, but it's not installed yet. If you can wait a few months, I can give you a report :D . I'm not optimistic for the reasons quoted above, but Bosch generally does a superb job.

I dunno...Bosch has always made good products, but I think they're pushing the limits with the diversity of new tech...I've installed their tankless and wasn't impressed with the performance compared to other more experienced tankless MFG's.

Mikey
07-12-2007, 05:58 PM
I'll take a peek at the Bosch installation manual next week and report back on the technology they use.

Mikey
07-22-2007, 09:41 AM
The manual doesn't say much of anything about how it works, but it appears to be an air-cooled condenser, which doesn't bode well for its efficiency, especially here in Florida. It also cautions that if the clothes come out of the dryer damp, they were "too wet" when put into the dryer, and should be spun at a higher speed in the washer. Just a passing mention that the condensate drain line should go to waste, and could use the same drain as the washer.

To use a conventional dryer, you've got to provide makeup air, so that messes up the conditioned space in which the dryer lives. This unvented dryer clearly must warm the ambient air, but might not add much humidity. I'm going to vent the laundry room to the attic, so my makeup air will be too hot in the summer, too cold in the winter, and just right in the spring and fall for a few days.

All in all, I'm still in watchful waiting mode. This Bosch should be installed and running in a few months; I'll keep you posted.

jadnashua
07-22-2007, 02:11 PM
Look into heat recovery ventilation. The better ones manage both heat and humidity.

John in herndon
08-06-2007, 09:59 AM
I have actually seen one of these (not in the USA,I might add). It uses a refirgeration system (like a dehumidifier) to remove water from the air. It puts a TREMENDOUS amount of heat into the room, as you might imagine. It also takes forever to dry a load and you must empty a collection tank manually.

I didn't see the KW load, but I imagine that it sets new highs for inefficiency. I suppose it might be the only option if you live in an apartment sealed off from the outside, but I certainly wouldn't choose one otherwise.

Mr_Pike
08-07-2007, 10:29 AM
Self Vented Electric Dryer = Clothes Line and Fan.

You could also try a treadmill I hear they work great for hanging clothes on as well.

frenchie
08-07-2007, 12:24 PM
I thought I'd already posted this... not sure of the brand, but a client of mine got one of these last year. Combi washer-dryer, I don't recall the brand...

Near as we can tell, it uses cold water to condense the moisture. At least that's how it seems, because it definitely uses some cold water during the dry cycle.

Takes forever & a day to run a load, but she loves it (tiny NYC apartment, no easy way to vent, etc) because she doesn't have to shlepp to the laudromat anymore (62 years old, 5th floor walk-up apartment)

marksmithjones
08-21-2007, 09:35 PM
I have a Bosch condensation dryer (Bosch "Axxis") in my condo as well as the matching washer. The washer is front-loading and highly energy efficient. The dryer does not need to be vented to the outside. Rather than blowing hot humid air out a vent, it runs the humid air through a condensation unit which removes the moisture and pumps it down the drain (the same standpipe used by the washer). The drying time is about the same as with a traditional dryer. Contrary to what another poster indicated, it is highly energy efficient. I can honestly say it is the best dryer I have ever owned and recommend it highly.

jadnashua
08-22-2007, 06:15 AM
You'd have to show me the specs...I find it hard to believe that both heating the clothing, then running a dehumidifier is more efficient than venting the hot, moist air outside. Admittedly, it is a viable alternative when you can't exhaust it outside, but energy efficient...show me. It becomes more useful with a high efficiency, front loading washer, since it can spin faster and extract more water out of the clothes before they go into the dryer, but still...

marksmithjones
08-22-2007, 08:47 PM
My comments: The condensing unit sort of looks like an automotive radiator and is also referred to as a "heat exchanger". The condensing unit itself does not consume power....essentially hot humid air from inside the dryer is collided with dry cool air drawn in from the room. I'm probably not explaining that technically correctly, but that's the gist of it.

Below is a description from a Bosch buyer's guide.

What is condensation drying?
Condensation drying is an enclosed drying system that requires no outside venting or ducting of hot air.

How does the condensation drying system in the Bosch WTL5410 work?
Dryer air is heated by the heating element. The heated air extracts moisture from the clothes and is forced through the condensing unit. Cool dry air is pulled in at the front and drawn through the condensing unit. Moisture from the hot, moist air condenses when it intersects with the cool air at the condensing unit, extracting moisture. Dry air is returned to the drum, not vented to the outside. The cool air flow is vented into the room and constantly replaced by new room air. The condensed water is automatically pumped out.

From Ottawa, ON
02-28-2008, 05:49 PM
I'm very curious to know whether the ambient temperature of the room increases when the dryer runs. In a medium size apartment, no noise from the machine is good, but if the room gets hot.... well that wouldn't be good.

Anyone at there who actually owns/uses of of these who can say? I haven't seen anyone speaking about this.

thanks.... :o)

jadnashua
02-29-2008, 08:15 AM
The heat is added to the room...

Bill Arden
03-02-2008, 12:14 AM
I've been tempted to use one of my "high vacuum" vacuum pumps...
But it would take a bit of energy and possibly freeze the clothes due to the evaporation.

From a thermodynamic point of view, the goal is to remove moisture without wasting energy.

A heat exchanger could be used to remove moisture using less energy.

Then there is the reusable moisture absorbent packets.

Mikey
03-02-2008, 04:05 PM
From a thermodynamic point of view, the goal is to remove moisture without wasting energy.
The best way I've found is, sadly, banned by many homeowners associations:
3934

leejosepho
03-03-2008, 02:51 PM
Wow! Were you peeking into our backyard in the '50s?!

Great idea.