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Ian Gills
05-20-2010, 08:08 PM
This is really starting to annoy me.

Take it from a Brit, if you've got a leak America CALL IN A PLUMBER! Not many good ones made it over on the boat here but hey.

And I don't see a single one.

Here's my solution: send the top hat down and freeze the water around the leak. Just like what you might do with changing a leaking main valve.

BP are sending Toto to fix a problem that requires American Standard.

Terry
05-21-2010, 04:27 AM
They have "American" workers on the problem now Ian.
What's your point?

Are you saying they need workers from other parts of the world to figure this out?
Maybe someone from England, they people that only have hot water in the house on weekends?
And low piddly pressure at that?
I doubt that the English would know how to work on high pressure piping.


It is a shame, all this talk of that exact area being a "dead zone" in the Gulf from farming pollution and now they dump oil into it.
It's just sad.

Ian Gills
05-21-2010, 12:51 PM
What's your point?

My point was that plumbers would probably have better ideas to fix the leak but I bet they haven't called any.

And the rest was just my usual jibes at Americans.

Blame America first.

Doherty Plumbing
05-21-2010, 02:20 PM
My point was that plumbers would probably have better ideas to fix the leak but I bet they haven't called any.

And the rest was just my usual jibes at Americans.

Blame America first.

Errmm.... a plumber would know nothing about stoping an oil leak 5000' below the oceans surface.

You can't just pick up parts for that at your local wholesaler....

JAR8832
05-21-2010, 02:33 PM
Google " Ixtoc 1". Same type of incident, except much more oil. It happened in 1979 - 1980 and nobody even remembers it.

Ian Gills
05-21-2010, 06:54 PM
Errmm.... a plumber would know nothing about stoping an oil leak 5000' below the oceans surface.


I'm not asking him to do it, just what might work. The same principles apply whether you're plumbing at 10 atmospheres of pressure or 1000.


Google " Ixtoc 1". Same type of incident, except much more oil. It happened in 1979 - 1980 and nobody even remembers it.

Interesting. Red Adair capped that one. And he sounded like a plumber, although he was a bomb disposal expert.

"It scares you—all the noise, the rattling, the shaking. But the look on everybody's face when you're finished and packing, it's the best smile in the world; and there's nobody hurt, and the well's under control."

"Retire? I don't know what that word means. As long as a man is able to work and he's productive out there and he feels good—keep at it. I've got too many of my friends that retired and went home and got on a rocking chair, and about a year and a half later, I'm always going to the cemetery."

"There are two things I really like about my job. When the phone rings I never know where I'm heading to next - and I'm never bothered by life-insurance salesmen!"

"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

Dunbar Plumbing
05-21-2010, 10:15 PM
When this oil slick pulls around florida and heads up the east coast, and we start having hurricanes in that area?

One of the hugest man made disasters is going to unfold in front of our eyes.


No way one company can possibly pay for the billions in damage that is coming. This tiers into a social disaster more than ecological when you figure how many will lose (beaches/fisheries/vacation industry)

And the health problems from the exposure by air will start bogging down the hospitals in those areas. Evaporation process, I'm not sure of but clouds don't exist without evaporation and I don't know if particulates of this disaster can reach the sky or not.

The media is just teasing us with the disaster....it's more than anyone knows.

jimbo
05-22-2010, 06:23 AM
I just heard on the news this AM that BP had engaged Kevin Kostner...the actor....because apparenly he has invented some kind of device to recover oil from the near shore, to ward off the ecological damages. I haven't seen the detail of this yet, but if it works......git'r done!!!!!!!

Ian Gills
05-22-2010, 07:03 AM
I think taxpayers should pay for it.

Like they should for health and higher education.

This is not my country, but I wouldn't mind putting my hand in my pocket to prevent harm to people along the affected Coasts.

Dunbar Plumbing
05-22-2010, 12:37 PM
Here's an inside story:


A russian company was on that platform when this all transpired. Their bit got stuck when they was drilling. This company told BP that it would take weeks to get that bit freed up and BP said no, hurry up and drill down beside the casing to free it up.

When that new bit went down to free it up, it was red hot and was told to BP how dangerous it was to do that, knowing there was natural gas pockets.

That's what triggered the explosion...BP wanting speed and not safety.

What you'll see in the next 10 years is BP disappearing from the landscape of retail, meaning gas stations. Same way with Exxon, you don't see many of those around much anymore.

Redwood
05-23-2010, 09:14 AM
What I understand about British Petroleum is BP = Big Problems...

Ixtoc 1 went for 9 months before it was capped....

sjsmithjr
05-24-2010, 12:22 PM
I just heard on the news this AM that BP had engaged Kevin Kostner...the actor....because apparenly he has invented some kind of device to recover oil from the near shore, to ward off the ecological damages.

Costner has been financing the development of the technology for the past fifteen years. Basically centrifuges capable of handling up to 200 gallons per minute. Last I heard they'll be trying it out next week.

As with any accident of this magnitude, more than one thing had to go wrong. If they lose the wellhead before they finish the two relief wells it could be the makings of an unprecedented disaster. Guess the safety celebtration BP was having onboard was a little premature.

Ian Gills
05-27-2010, 08:56 AM
So, they're using the old bread in the water pipe trick.

I really think one of you could have suggested that weeks ago. But hey. :rolleyes:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/us_and_canada/10174861.stm

FloridaOrange
05-27-2010, 12:34 PM
I'm so thrilled the Brits subbed to the Ruskies to polute my shores....:(

Ian Gills
05-27-2010, 02:17 PM
Ideally US taxpayers would have paid for it, but they don't seem interested.

Wally Hays
05-28-2010, 07:13 AM
And yet Obama, the smartest guy to ever be president is running around telling everyone this is the wors environmental disaster in history.

Dana
05-28-2010, 08:38 AM
...make that the worst environmental disaster in US history.

Despite being in the gulf (and quite huge), Ixtoc 1 was in the Yucatan, more than 500 miles from from US shores. It's impact on US estuaries was far less due to to both dilution and the two months of warning in which there was time to form and implement a mitigation plan. This blunted the environmental effects in the US considerably. Although the damage in Texas was still significant, it's was not nearly what is now expected in LA/MI/AL (no matter what measures are taken.) The barrier islands protecting the TX coast are much more substantial & continous than those in LA/MI too- it was simply easier to protect.

As a single-event type of environmental disaster, it's hard to think of any past incidents in the US that will have the kind of impact that this oil spill will. Killing the grasses that hold the barrier islands together will leave the the inner coastal marshlands set up for the 1-2 punch on gulf storms in years to come. If the coral reefs in FL are impacted things could get very dicey in the Keys over the next few decades too. The Florida Keys are much closer to this spill than Texas is to Ixpoc-I. This party is just getting started.

Wally Hays
05-28-2010, 12:57 PM
Betcha that within 5 years nobody will be talking about it and the damage will be nowhere near as bad as they are saying it will.

Ian Gills
05-28-2010, 07:05 PM
Betcha in 5 years, you won't be driving F150s because of this and gas will be more expensive too.

It it had happened on foreign shores no one here would care.

When it happens at home, Americans start to sit up and take notice. Not on my doorstep mister.

It is a mixed blessing.

It's American oil, drilled on American shores for American consumers.

American voters will think of Florida wetlands and Louisiana shrimp farmers next time they fill up at the pump.

Whereas they rarely think twice about the polar ice caps or the turmoil in the Middle East.

Don't undersestimate just how much this will change the world. And all because, for once, America's love of oil has affected the lives and livelihoods of Americans directly.

It is an environmental tragedy, but you pays your money and you takes your chances.

Oil is now dead because you cannot fill your car with gas when your neighbor's yard looks like this.

http://cdn.wn.com/ph/img/0a/16/edca20237d79e2e31a1bdadd15bd-grande.jpg

Nothing pisses an American off more than seeing another American suffer.

So y'all better suck it up and start taking the bus.

I know I will be.

Cookie
05-28-2010, 08:42 PM
America is always there for all the other countries. We put our lives and money on the line for so many others, which we get so little thanks for, instead a whole lot of criticism. Let's see who helps us.

Dunbar Plumbing
05-29-2010, 07:14 PM
This could of been solved 3 days after it happened by positioning a nuclear warhead and sealing it off by explosion. BP and greed doesn't want that because that is a top producing well, and their thinking is, what's a few 100 million more gallons of oil at this point. Seal that well and they'll never get that chance twice.

Now I'm no meteorologist... See More/weather forecaster but everyone is saying the temperature of the water is up, primed for hurricane weather. I don't know if evaporation is possible to bring this into storm systems but already this oil slick is gassing off, otherwise people on shore wouldn't be having health problems already.

Wait till a hurricane approaches that coastline like it has for the past few years.

A 1/2 million dollar valve weighing 462 tons and 40 foot tall, disaster controlled, not avoided. Should of called a plumber.

Redwood
05-29-2010, 10:48 PM
It's amazing what a nuke could fix!

So far ending wars seems to be the only application it has been called in for use on...

clausbelly
06-01-2010, 12:15 AM
In the beginning, British Petroleum came up with several ideas for stopping the oil leak. All have failed so far, but they are now attempting to plug the hole with assorted garbage. They call it “Operation Top Kill.” I worry about all the families that make their living from the Gulf, the shellfish and the tourist, as well as teh off-shore workers that live with danger every day. I have family that work off shore and many more that work in the petro-chemical industry.

FloridaOrange
06-01-2010, 04:50 AM
Betcha that within 5 years nobody will be talking about it and the damage will be nowhere near as bad as they are saying it will.

Easy to say when you live in New England.


This could of been solved 3 days after it happened by positioning a nuclear warhead and sealing it off by explosion.

Really? You want to set off a nuke in the Gulf? It probably wouldn't work (too large) and may even rupture more "shallow" oil reserves, besides it would be trading the environmental consequences of leaking oil with radiating everything in the gulf. All around the gulf are breeding grounds for alot of life, and not just life that lives in the gulf, plenty of species only come into the gulf only to breed.


In the beginning, British Petroleum came up with several ideas for stopping the oil leak. All have failed so far, but they are now attempting to plug the hole with assorted garbage. They call it “Operation Top Kill.” I worry about all the families that make their living from the Gulf, the shellfish and the tourist, as well as teh off-shore workers that live with danger every day. I have family that work off shore and many more that work in the petro-chemical industry.

Top Kill has been called off as a failure......

Redwood
06-01-2010, 09:23 AM
They are now cutting off the damaged riser and are going to attempt a "Sharkbite" style valve installation on the fly...
The only problem is that the damaged pipe they are cutting off is kinked so it is restricting the flow.
If BP screws the pooch on this one it will get worse!

Given the amount of messing up BP has done so far I don't have much confidence in success for their latest plan...
It seem the stock market shares the same thoughts as BP has had its share value drop by a third.

Here is a link to a live feed from the BP ROV doing the cutting operation.
To me it like the equivalent of someone trying to cut 6" cast iron pipe with a Dremel tool...
More like a scratch the pipe and bind bind the blade operation.
BP ROV Live Feed (http://www.bp.com/liveassets/bp_internet/globalbp/globalbp_uk_english/homepage/STAGING/local_assets/bp_homepage/html/rov_stream.html)

Matt,
I live in New England and I worry about seeing the effects of the oil spill here...
I'm sure that it's effects will at least reach Cape Hatteras...

Frankly I thing they have a snowballs chance in hell of plugging this before the relief wells are drills and even that probably isn't going to connect on the first several attempts. Drilling just isn't that accurate.

The Ixtoc well that they are comparing this to was in only 50 meters of water and this one is in 5,000' of water.
The Ixtoc well took 9 months to cap!

I predict that by late summer most of the Atlantic Coast will be finding tar balls washed up on shore.
Of course they will probably be claimed to not be from the Deepwater Horizon blowout.
I don't think many people realize the magnitude of this disaster.

So much of it has been hidden by the undersea deployment of dispersants and it's effects are unknown.
What we are seeing is the tip of the iceberg.

All I can say is I have snorkeled in the Keys and seen the coral reef...
I'm glad I did!
The people that haven't done it yet and future generations are going to miss the chance.

Wally, while the spill may not make headlines years from now its effects will live on.
In 1969 there was an oil spill in Buzzards Bay, The spill was diesel oil which is much lighter than the crude that BP is spilling.
40 years later on the surface the spill in Buzzards bay is not all that apparent but in the sediment the oil is still there virtually unchanged.
Its effects lingering on...
It just doesn't show up in the post cards...

Oil is dirty business!

FloridaOrange
06-01-2010, 09:35 AM
Matt,
I live in New England and I worry about seeing the effects of the oil spill here...
I'm sure that it's effects will at least reach Cape Hatteras...


I didn't intend my comment to everyone living in NE, just the one making slight of this problem. I don't want it to go up the eastern seaboard either, the damage to Chesapeak Bay would be as bad as the damage that's occuring on the LA coast.
The keys definitely worry me, if (maybe when) the reefs are destroyed it will be for generations to come. I've been diving in the keys and it's absolutely incredible down there.
If I see the oil on my doorstep the oil has already made it down to the keys..........


The accident doesn't piss me off so much as the response to it, accidents happen and we live on oil. BP could've done more (maybe) if they weren't intent in the begininning to save the well vs. stopping the oil.

Redwood
06-01-2010, 11:21 AM
I didn't intend my comment to everyone living in NE, just the one making slight of this problem. I don't want it to go up the eastern seaboard either, the damage to Chesapeak Bay would be as bad as the damage that's occuring on the LA coast.
The keys definitely worry me, if (maybe when) the reefs are destroyed it will be for generations to come. I've been diving in the keys and it's absolutely incredible down there.
If I see the oil on my doorstep the oil has already made it down to the keys..........

I know that Matt!
I didn't take it that way either...

Most people just don't realize the magnitude of this disaster...

Early on when comparisons were being made to Ixtoc and Admiral Allen of the Coast Guard was saying, "We are in uncharted territory." I had a pretty good Idea of how grim the situation was.

This spill is pretty much destined to be a shoe in for the #2 spot on the worlds worst oil spill list...

If you want to see the effects of a spill of this magnitude you may look at the lingering effects of the Gulf War Oil Spill nearly 20 years later.
The health of people in the region is still affected by it.

Dunbar Plumbing
06-01-2010, 12:15 PM
Eas



Really? You want to set off a nuke in the Gulf? It probably wouldn't work (too large) and may even rupture more "shallow" oil reserves, besides it would be trading the environmental consequences of leaking oil with radiating everything in the gulf. All around the gulf are breeding grounds for alot of life, and not just life that lives in the gulf, plenty of species only come into the gulf only to breed.



Top Kill has been called off as a failure......


You should be smart enough by now to comprehend and F-ing understand that nuclear devices come in all levels of design. Not everything is that huge mushroom cloud everyone would think it to be.

We have millions of gallons of oil in the sea and you're worried about some F-ing sea monkeys being harmed?

Understand that thousands of gallons are dumping into the ocean and by the time they fix this F-up it's going to be massive.

A controlled detonation will create enough of a depth into the earth's crust to hopefully pile up the same dense material they drilled through to seal it off.

Nothing has worked so far and people are complaining about ideas to stop it...what a joke.

Redwood
06-01-2010, 12:28 PM
"Controlled Detonation" is not usually associated with Nuclear Explosions!

LOL

FloridaOrange
06-01-2010, 12:32 PM
I understand (in a layman way) low yield nukes but how about we test those out near your neighborhood first.
Yes I am concerned about the f'n sea monkeys, more importantly all the other things living around and feeding off of them.
This is no joke to me, I don't want my family to get sick and I also would love my daughter to be able to enjoy our water and beaches much the same as I have for many years.

Dana
06-01-2010, 02:19 PM
Betcha that within 5 years nobody will be talking about it and the damage will be nowhere near as bad as they are saying it will.

In much the same way that nobody's talkin' about Chernobyl, I s'pose...

Until they actually succeed at putting a cork in it the upper bound of the damage can't be determined- like I said, this party's just gettin' started (and unlike Ixtoc-I it's in-our-face, there's no avoiding it, or the longer term effects.)

But even if they plugged it today (and I sure hope they do, but I'm not holding my breath), it'll still be the largest single-event environmental disaster in US history. I'm glad not to be dependent upon Louisiana fisheries for a living.

But whether the F150 remains the commuter-car of choice in 5 years depends more on Chinese energy policy than the costs of environmental damage mitigation in the Gulf of Mexico. China is currently burning ~1/3 as much oil as the US, but is on track to be using 2/3-3/4 as much by 2020, exceeding US consumption by ~2025. There aren't enough drilling rigs in the world to keep pace with the increase in Asian appetite- US efficiency will be enforced by the market: People driving mopeds & mini-cars short-haul in India & China are willing and better-able to pay a much steeper price per gallon than a 100mile/day suburban commuter in an F150.

Dunbar Plumbing
06-01-2010, 04:38 PM
I understand (in a layman way) low yield nukes but how about we test those out near your neighborhood first.
Yes I am concerned about the f'n sea monkeys, more importantly all the other things living around and feeding off of them.
This is no joke to me, I don't want my family to get sick and I also would love my daughter to be able to enjoy our water and beaches much the same as I have for many years.

Low yield nukes.


Do you really think...


Do you really think they haven't tested the capabilities of nuclear devices all these years...the past 50 years??? Do you think a nuclear engineer wouldn't of spoke out on this matter if they knew of a way to stop this? I shouldn't be trading this information around as I'm hearing it from within, someone directly tied to the efforts to resolve this matter and it's fear that no one knows an end to.


You've got the sea turning black and you think that one explosion underwater to attempt to seal off this matter is more dangerous than....a few million gallons of crude oil washing ashore.....



Good luck with your beach front and oil tainted air when it pulls up the east coast. It'll take weeks/months to drill a relief well. You think that accuracy will be without mistake....

Redwood
06-01-2010, 05:12 PM
Considering the only "Documented Testing" on this application was coming out of the USSR and was thinly disguised underground nuclear weapons testing do you really want to go there?

My concern is it would be more like hydro-fraking gone out of control and they no longer have a casing to work with but rather a cracked seabed with oil oozing out over a large area until the pressure of the oil deposit equalizes and the flow stops...

Cookie
06-01-2010, 05:46 PM
It seems to me they could easily place a tube into the pipe to capture the oil. They should also be able to stop the flow in the same manner a doctor would use a catheter for kidney functions . Placing a tube with a ballon to seal the spill and then either, offload the oil or stop until they can replace with the proper pipe casing.

In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct, or vessel. Catheters allow drainage, injection of fluids, or access by surgical instruments. The process of inserting a catheter is catheterization. In most uses, a catheter is a thin, flexible tube ("soft" catheter), though in some uses, it is a larger, solid ("hard") catheter. A catheter left inside the body, either temporarily or permanently, may be referred to as an indwelling catheter. A permanently inserted catheter may be referred to as a permcath.

Get a couple of doctors down there, lol.

Dunbar Plumbing
06-01-2010, 06:56 PM
Considering the only "Documented Testing" on this application was coming out of the USSR and was thinly disguised underground nuclear weapons testing do you really want to go there?

My concern is it would be more like hydro-fraking gone out of control and they no longer have a casing to work with but rather a cracked seabed with oil oozing out over a large area until the pressure of the oil deposit equalizes and the flow stops...


Was you in contact with someone that actually has inside information about this disaster, like I do? I didn't seek out this fellow, I just ended up working for him and talked at length about the seriousness of this situation and how 5,280 feet down in the water is a huge problem. I was talking to someone who has a brother that's in the top brass of this. They are talking about using a nuclear device to stop it. That's what you don't find on a google search and yes,

that's the extreme measures they are looking at to somehow stop this disaster before it curls around florida and rolls up the east coast.

Well wishers have their place...but the powers that be are extremely worried about NOT stopping this flow, armchair opinions aside.

Redwood
06-01-2010, 08:21 PM
Was you in contact with someone that actually has inside information about this disaster, like I do? I didn't seek out this fellow, I just ended up working for him and talked at length about the seriousness of this situation and how 5,280 feet down in the water is a huge problem. I was talking to someone who has a brother that's in the top brass of this. They are talking about using a nuclear device to stop it. That's what you don't find on a google search and yes,

that's the extreme measures they are looking at to somehow stop this disaster before it curls around florida and rolls up the east coast.

Well wishers have their place...but the powers that be are extremely worried about NOT stopping this flow, armchair opinions aside.

I guess we'll just have to see how this all works out...

How is that Tsunami doing....
Did it come in yet?

By the way...
I'm watching a live feed of BP ROVs cutting the riser pipe right now...
BP ROV Riser Cutting Operation (http://www.bp.com/liveassets/bp_internet/globalbp/globalbp_uk_english/homepage/STAGING/local_assets/bp_homepage/html/rov_stream.html)

erhein35
06-01-2010, 11:11 PM
A human hair can also help this problem because the oil will easily stick to the hair according to some experiments.

Redwood
06-02-2010, 01:20 AM
A human hair can also help this problem because the oil will easily stick to the hair according to some experiments.

Yea, so can hay and nukes...

Go to this link to submit your suggestion... (http://www.horizonedocs.com/artform.php)

Dunbar Plumbing
06-02-2010, 08:28 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_gulf_oil_spill


FAIL



"The effort underwater was going on as oil drifted close to the Florida Panhandle's white sand beaches for the first time"

20% increase in flow once the cut is made to open and cap. Relief well is over 2 months away.

FloridaOrange
06-02-2010, 10:16 AM
24-72 hour surface oil slick forcast.

http://www.nbc-2.com/Global/story.asp?S=12580643

Redwood
06-02-2010, 01:05 PM
An Interesting Discussion of the Nuke Non-Option...
http://anz.theoildrum.com/node/6532

Pretty much a fail before the gate was even set up...
For obvious reasons...

Redwood
06-04-2010, 06:26 PM
I don't think a lot of people are aware of the big picture on this spill.

They are sitting there thinking, "Isn't it just terrible what is happening in the Gulf of Mexico with that oil spill." They are seeing oil soaked pelicans, dead fish and hearing how the shrimpers and crabbers are out of business... They are right it is horrible!

Now if you look at what our "American Idol" News Media isn't saying...
They are too busy trying to turn it into politics... As usual....

5,000' under water in the Gulf of Mexico there is a blown out oil well....
Getting a man down there is probably more difficult than sending a man to the moon, so all work is being done with ROVs operated by 3 man crews on the surface. Operating these ROVs is similar to flying a helicopter. They weigh 8,800 lbs. and have a 220 horse power motor and can carry a payload up to 900 lbs.

The pipe they cut off is 21" in diameter and 1" thick with a smaller drill casing pipe inside. Those bolts on the flange are 3 7/8" diameter and the nuts weigh 60 lbs. they are torqued to thousands of ft lbs. The failed blow out preventer weighs 450 tons. The oil in the reservoir below is at 9,000 psi and with the pressure of the sea water at that depth counteracting the pressure and restrictions in the wellhead is about 3,500 psi at the wellhead. If they were to shut off the flow at the top of the wellhead it would probably blow out again as the casing is compromised.

What they are doing is attempting to catch as much of the leaking oil they can using a riser similar to a chimney where the oil and gas being lighter than water will rise.

The hope for shutting off the flow lies in a bottom kill operation using relief wells that are going to intersect deep underground with the well where the casing is 7" in diameter. Drillers are saying thet having the relief done by August as stated in the media is a 20% chance, with a 90% chance for 1 year, and a 99% chance for 2 years.

National Center for Atmospheric Research ran a 6 model computer simulation for the spread of oil on ocean currents with just 2 months of leaking. The picture below shows about what should happen by August 20th just 4 months after the leak started....

The oil slick once it reaches between the tip of Florida and Cuba accelerates rapidly riding on the gulf stream covering 100 miles a day or 3,000 miles in a month...

Joe Six Pack
06-12-2010, 11:28 AM
Gulf oil for sale today I'm reading. They're going to scoop up oil out of the sea and sell it under "gulf oil from the sea" stickers.
Kinda like chicken of the sea, but now i't s going to be gulf oil from the sea. Cool.

Do they serve that with shrimp?

Terry
06-12-2010, 12:19 PM
Greenpeace is not calling for a ban, and with good reason. Many BP stations are independents. They may be buying their oil from local processors.
In the Seattle area, we get most of our oil from Alaska.



The company owns only a handful of the 11,000 stations that bear its brand and is trying to sell the few still on its books. So those who wish to inflict pain on the company are instead putting much of the hurt on the family businesses who actually own the stations.
Just how little does BP gain from its gas stations, besides whatever ancillary marketing benefit it gains from the signs? The gas in its pumps may not be extracted, refined or stored by the company and may just get a spritz of BP additives right before it ends up at the service station. All of this puts a mere handful of coins in the company's pocket per fill-up.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2012094603_bpboycott12.html



Why punish a family owned business that really has no substantial ties to BP?

Ian Gills
06-14-2010, 01:28 PM
Can I also add that it's not a British problem either.

Americans own half the shares in British Petroleum.

I think we all know in our heart of hearts that BP is not going to survive this. Americans are just too damn expensive to fix and even a company as big as BP will reach a limit on how much it can pay before it folds.

I still say bring the plumbers in. The bread in the pipe trick did not work, so freeze the sucker just like you might if my main valve broke.

Get y'all on a boat with a couple of beers and it will be fixed in a few hours.

Sure I could do it quicker, cheaper and better as a DIY but that's plumbing for ya.

Cookie
06-14-2010, 01:54 PM
Ya fight fire with fire, burn it out.

Scuba_Dave
06-14-2010, 08:23 PM
Can't burn the oil that is moving underwater
This is going to make it around Florida, the the gulf stream is going to take it up the coast
And they are already saying it will effect fisheries in New England
The bluefins spawn in the Gulf

Dunbar Plumbing
06-14-2010, 11:46 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_gulf_oil_spill


FAIL



"The effort underwater was going on as oil drifted close to the Florida Panhandle's white sand beaches for the first time"

20% increase in flow once the cut is made to open and cap. Relief well is over 2 months away.



I'll give yah a dollar if you can guess how many tens of thousands of gallons of oil have leaked since my last post on 6-02-10.

You think Operation Repo is bad on TruTv, wait till you see the faces on the people in florida when they are surrounded by an oil slick.


And here:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGxGVGiD3yk


This is just one of the issues that happens when that volume mass sits in one area, it's gassing off. Cancer rates are going to soar in those coastal states, no one will be able to pinpoint it.

It'll just happen, over time, victims.


Chevron just had a oil spill, there's another one leaking out there aside from this one. Media is tight lipped about 3, let alone one.

The Bp gas stations are losing all their customers here in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati area. People so pissed off about the poor design this has taken.

FloridaOrange
06-15-2010, 04:56 AM
The Science Channel was showing NatGeo's Gulf Oil "Spill" special last night. Very interesting and of course concerning. It seemed they were pandering to BP's image as a tradeoff for access though.

Redwood
06-15-2010, 06:30 AM
This link shows a post on The Oil Drum which is probably as accurate an assessment of the situation you will find anywhere.
Bear in mind "The Oil Drum" is an oil industry forum and just like here someone would rapidly shoot BS full of holes...
http://www.theoildrum.com/node/6593#comment-648967

When you read that you will have a pretty good idea of what is going on...
I assure you it's ugly and it won't be found in the papers...

Ian Gills
06-16-2010, 06:31 PM
I have come to the realization that American taxpayers will have to pay for this, which is no bad thing.

The industry should have been better regulated, so it's the fault of American voters.

Pay the taxes or have dirty beaches. The choice is yours.

I quite like the Golf Coast and Florida as well as the people living there, so as a non-American living here I propose to pay higher taxes.

Bigger Government is the only fix to this and more jobs for my friends in DC.

Redwood
06-16-2010, 08:42 PM
I have come to the realization that American taxpayers will have to pay for this, which is no bad thing.

The industry should have been better regulated, so it's the fault of American voters.

Pay the taxes or have dirty beaches. The choice is yours.

I quite like the Golf Coast and Florida as well as the people living there, so as a non-American living here I propose to pay higher taxes.

Bigger Government is the only fix to this and more jobs for my friends in DC.

Yea you are right...
After the hollow shell of BP is sold off to the Chinese the taxpayers will have it applied to their tab

BP will be long gone and forgotten but the mess will linger on....

Realist1
06-18-2010, 12:42 AM
British Petroleum has more than enough money to pay for this--the $20 billion they set aside is a drop in the bucket compared to the total value of their assets. Also, how come when an American company does something in Europe, lets say, it is the fault of the American company but a European company pollutes America and somehow then it is still the fault of America. Hypocrites like Ian, if they read a story about Microsoft or Intel doing something bad in Europe, would exclusively blame the American company and not Europeans for not regulating tightly enough.

Of course, the real goal of Europeans attacking America is to distract attention for their imperialist past (and present.) They can go on gleefully about how America is contributing to drug wars in Mexico, for example, but ignore narco states in West Africa financed by Euro drug money.

Ian Gills
06-18-2010, 06:02 AM
OK then blame the British. Just like New Orleans tried to do before they realized that a lot of the tourists that go there are from England. Duh!

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2010/6/17/1276794254334/Advert-for-New-Orleans-to-005.jpg

Like I said before, it's not really a British company any more. Americans own half the shares.

A bit like America really. Once ours but not any more. Although it was a little bit better when it was!

They were happy times.

http://z.about.com/d/dc/1/0/z/D/ColonialGuidesabouttown.jpg

ckyle
06-25-2010, 06:58 AM
A very concerning accident and the sad thing is there's not really much they can do to prevent a big oil spill. As already mentioned, the oil will be moving up to Florida and even New England will get its share of it. The natural consequences in the affected areas can't even be estimated yet, I am afraid it will be worse than most of us think. I am really angry at BP and all the people involved in the disaster, they are destroying earth.

MoverandShaker
06-25-2010, 11:58 AM
If this isn't sad, I don't know what is -- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hY-tIEqzcmU

Apparently the water has started to evaporate into the air and turn into rain water -- oily rain water. I don't even want to imagine how this oil spill is going to affect crops, homes and worst of all, people. Really scary stuff we're seeing here, I must say. What do you guys think? Isn't this horrible? I think the worst part of it is that if we DON'T BP, we risk having them lose all of their money and resources for actually fixing the oil spill. It's such an unusual and confusing situation.

Hairyhosebib
06-25-2010, 12:17 PM
I listen to George Noory on Coast to Coast AM. He had a guy on that said there is about a 15 mile span of Ocean floor Raising up around the well. The guy said they have been doing it all wrong. If that big underwater zit pops, we are really going to be in trouble! Don't shoot the messenger. It was in the last three weeks I heard this, I think.

ckyle
06-29-2010, 12:24 AM
Yeah, the next thing is that it seems like a lot of mistakes were made right after the actual accident - the oil could move underwater and spill and I am sure they could have done better in reacting to the accident and minimizing the damage.

Redwood
07-12-2010, 05:04 PM
Good news out of the gulf...

Sunday afternoon they dropped the transition riser in place on top of the gusher and they got a good flange seal made up.

They just completed dropping a new cap in place and locked it on with a hydraulic coupling a few minutes ago.

They may now after some testing possibly be able to shut the well off if its integrity looks good after testing...

Worst case scenario is they will be able to collect 100% of the oil and either process or burn it off at the surface except when severe storms come through and they have to disconnect.

Ian Gills
07-13-2010, 09:13 AM
They just completed dropping a new cap in place and locked it on with a hydraulic coupling a few minutes ago.


Sounds like one of Redwood's invoices.

Or in other words, fancy language for a fernco. Where were the plumbers when I asked them for solutions?

Three months later, millions of gallons spilled, wildlife killed and thousands of livelihoods at risk and the plumbers here couldn't even be bothered to slap a banded coupling on it!

Cookie
07-15-2010, 03:03 PM
Are you saying, " I told you so Ian?" :)

Ian Gills
07-15-2010, 05:50 PM
Yep!

Lazy plumbers could have solved it all along.

It just goes to show, if a job is really difficult forget the plumber and either call an electrician or - better still - a deck builder.

Deck building is really quite hard, you know.

Redwood
07-16-2010, 07:55 AM
BP is getting ready for a name change to finance the clean up now...

How's American Petroleum sound Ian...

Big government getting bigger just how you like it....

Ian Gills
07-16-2010, 01:39 PM
I do like a big Federal Government that employs a lot of people.

The government has traditionally been the standard-bearer for minority participation in the workforce. Consider African-Americans: they make up 13% percent of the U.S. population and — according to the latest available count (2008) — more than 18% of the Federal workforce. Certainly we should credit most of this progress to vigorous initiatives by Federal agencies, beginning in the early 1970s, to recruit and retain talented African-Americans.

I also like that a Big Government doing more means that we get more for our tax dollars.

Your taxes are so high here and yet you get so little from the State.

That means Americans are all a bunch of suckers.

Big Government = Big Happiness. Let them provide. It's what you pay them for.

Cookie
07-19-2010, 06:10 AM
'Mystery Plumber' May Have Sketched Designs Almost Identical to the Oil Cap
By PATRIK JONSSON
July 17, 2010—


"Joe the Plumber" became a household name in 2008, but will anyone ever know the identity of the plumber who may have brought BP to the brink of stopping the oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico.

Six weeks ago, Robert Bea, an engineering professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received a late-night call from an apologetic "mystery plumber." The caller said he had a sketch for how to solve the problem at the bottom of the Gulf. It was a design for a containment cap that would fit snugly over the top of the failed blowout preventer at the heart of the Gulf oil spill.

Bea, a former Shell executive and well-regarded researcher, thought the idea looked good and sent the sketches directly to the US Coast Guard and to a clearinghouse set up to glean ideas from outside sources for how to cap the stubborn Macondo well.

When Bea saw the design of the containment cap lowered onto the well last week, he marveled at its similarity to the sketches from the late-night caller, whose humble refusal to give his name at the time nearly brought Bea to tears.

"The idea was using the top flange on the blowout preventer as an attachment point and then employing an internal seal against that flange surface," says Bea. "You can kind of see how a plumber thinks this way. That's how they have to plumb homes for sewage."

BP has received 300,000 ideas from around the world for how to cap the well after decades-old methods failed. Everyone from amateur inventors to engineers, Hollywood stars to hucksters, have swamped the unified command with ideas.

BP executive Doug Suttles says the new containment cap design came from weeks of trial and error. "We've been adding and trying new things constantly," Suttles said last week.

The design was originally intended to increase BP's ability to siphon oil from the well to containment ships on the surface. But in the past two weeks, it became clear to the company that the design, if it passed certain well integrity tests, could also be used to stop the flow altogether. If successful, the containment structure will be a turning point in the Gulf oil spill drama.

BP spokesman Mark Salt says, "There's no way of finding out at the moment" whether Bea's forwarded suggestion from the self-described "lowly plumber" made it into the design. "There's also a good chance that this was already being designed by the time this [tip] came in."

On the other hand, Salt adds, "I'm sure we've used bits and pieces of suggestions [from the outside] and have picked things out that could be used going forward."

As part of the response, the BP oil spill unified command has set up a triage of more than 30 technical personnel who put suggestions into three buckets: not possible; already considered; or feasible. According to the website, there are about 100 ideas from the outside being considered as ways to help stem the wellhead flow.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2010/0715/BP-oil-spill-Mystery-plumber-may-be-brains-behind-containment-cap

Ian Gills
07-19-2010, 07:19 AM
And who came up with the idea to ask a plumber in the first place?

It must have been an East Coast plumber. They're the best ones you know.

But still not as clever as electricians or deck builders.

A bit brighter than home inspectors though.

maddog
07-19-2010, 09:11 AM
It was actually a plumber that posts on this forum ....

Redwood
07-19-2010, 09:28 AM
Looks like they have found oil seeping out of the seabed near the well...

They may have to reopen the well...

http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2010/0719/BP-oil-seep-could-spell-trouble-for-containment-cap

Ian Gills
07-19-2010, 09:32 AM
They think it was Joe Caldart. Anyone heard of him?

That cap will hold.

http://www.tonic.com/article/mystery-plumber-revealed/

Terry
07-19-2010, 12:01 PM
As usual, a plumber is protecting the health of the Nation

Thanks Joe,
Ian was right, it took a plumber. Why are we not even surprised.
http://www.facebook.com/joe.caldart

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=11053&stc=1&d=1279561133
Joe Caldart