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woog
11-28-2009, 06:27 AM
Has anyone ever heard of this technology... I need a water softener and the company I spoke to said this is where the industry is going because it is much more environmentally friendly than a typical salt based softener. Supposedly it is being used in Europe and Asia but is just starting to make its way to the US. Also, are there any non salt based technologies that someone could recommend? I have city water that is very good quality except for hardness and a little chlorine taste but it's not undrinkable.

Thanks for your help...

liveinfixer
11-28-2009, 08:05 AM
Has anyone ever heard of this technology... I need a water softener and the company I spoke to said this is where the industry is going because it is much more environmentally friendly than a typical salt based softener. Supposedly it is being used in Europe and Asia but is just starting to make its way to the US. Also, are there any non salt based technologies that someone could recommend? I have city water that is very good quality except for hardness and a little chlorine taste but it's not undrinkable.

Thanks for your help...

Sounds like an ordinary modern water softener. There's at least two guys who post here all the time that can expain salt dosing perfectly so I won't bother.

There are filters available that can cope with about anything but hardness it seems. Non salt "softeners" (very touchy subject) do not soften water. If you want really nice water (from what you've posted) you'd need a minimum of a carbon filter and a softener.

The things you need to know even just to start thinking about it are: Hardness, Iron, ph, nitrates/nitrites (you already know you have chlorine). Then you can contact someone like Gary Slusser or Budget Water and start figureing out what you really need.

Gary Slusser
11-28-2009, 11:08 AM
Has anyone ever heard of this technology... I need a water softener and the company I spoke to said this is where the industry is going because it is much more environmentally friendly than a typical salt based softener. Supposedly it is being used in Europe and Asia but is just starting to make its way to the US. Also, are there any non salt based technologies that someone could recommend? I have city water that is very good quality except for hardness and a little chlorine taste but it's not undrinkable.

Thanks for your help...
I believe you mean chemical dosing of a polyphosphate that sequesters the calcium and magnesium (hardness minerals) to prevent them from causing the hard water problems they usually cause.

That is not a water softener because it doesn't remove hardness, it is supposed to make the water act like softened water by preventing teh problems hard water causes. It uses a solution feeder or crystals that dissolve as water runs through a housing filled with the crystals. It is usually used for iron treatment. It usually will not work if the water is heated after treatment because heat breaks the bond releasing the iron back into the water stream.

What you need is a correctly sized water softener. I suggest it use the Clack WS-1 control valve.

woog
11-28-2009, 11:45 AM
Thanks for the answers guys... I was a little unsure about this as I never heard of the technology. I think I will stick to the salt based systems as I guess that sounds best. Gary.. can i ask you... are there any technologies out there that will soften the water without salt?

Thanks again .

Gary Slusser
11-28-2009, 12:40 PM
Well, there is distillation and RO (reverse osmosis) but on a POE (whole house) application you probably don't want to pay for them or their upkeep and operation costs. Same for membrane based nanofiltration.