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View Full Version : what delta plumbing parts am I missing here?



myladyfae
10-13-2009, 12:20 PM
I'm a little confused by all the many options, and I'm not sure I've accounted for everything I need to order for my new shower! I'm putting in:

Delta Victorian Monitor 17 Series Tub & Shower Faucet T17455 Chrome
Delta Victorian Shower Mount Handshower - Model #: 54513 Chrome
Delta Thermostatic Tub or Shower Valve R10000-UNBX

I suspect I need a diverter in there somewhere, but I don't want the huge fancy set with the body sprays...just an optional hand shower. I'm only interested in running one or the other too, not both at the same time.

thanks!!
rebecca

dcelite
10-13-2009, 10:21 PM
I'm a little confused also. I see a tub & shower faucet and I see a thermostatic tub/shower valve. Are a faucet and a valve the same thing?

DC

myladyfae
10-14-2009, 06:36 AM
well I know the faucet is basically just trim except for the cartridge which in this case is 2 function for temp and pressure. The valve is what brings it all together I think. The one I have I believe is multifunction (although i could be wrong!) and would work with a single, dual, or thermostatic functioning cartridge.

I'm not sure though if I need a separate diverter though? The picture makes it look like it has 2 ports, which could be all I need, but I'm just not sure!

jadnashua
10-14-2009, 06:38 AM
You can buy kits that contain the trim and the guts (called the rough-in valve). On some Delta rough-in valves (from what I seem to remember) you have a choice of several cartridges that go into the rough-in valve body - for example, you may use a thermostatic cartridge, or a pressure balanced one. You must choose trim that fits both the rough-in valve AND the cartridge you choose.

Some places sell the complete kit, but a plumbing supply house likely sells the pieces as mix and match.

So, basically, you need three things:
- rough-in
- cartridge (may come with rough-in)
- trim

If you need to divert the water from one device to the other (say the tub spout to the showerhead), you have a choice of either using a tub spout with a built-in divertor (they don't all come this way), OR, buying an additional divertor valve. Those can be confusing in and of themselves, as they can be purchased to control multiple items, and various combinations of things. You need to decide what thing(s) you want to get water simulaneously. The more combinations, the more complicated, the more expensive.

Depending on the brand and style, some rough-in valves may have an internal divertor function as well.

Didn't answer your question directly, but this should help in trying to decipher what you are looking at.

hj
10-14-2009, 08:50 AM
The simplest way to do it is to have a diverter on the shower arm with the head and handheld attached to it.