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View Full Version : Seperate and reuse PVC piping???



Tabb
10-18-2004, 09:39 AM
I replaced the drain pipe under my kitchen sink when I installed a new waste disposer but failed to seal a section of pipe properly between the trap and t-fitting. Can I seperate the two pieces and reuse if I've glued them with cement? It was glued less than 24 hrs ago. Thanks.

thomas_callahan
10-18-2004, 10:07 AM
I'm not a plumber but I can tell you from personal experience that no, once PVC is glued that's it. The PVC glue actually melts the PVC pieces and fuses them into one piece. And it happens in seconds so even one minute after you've glued it, it's too late, and even if you re-separate them in 5 seconds, they're still not reusable as they will have begun melting and won't fit back together, at least not well.

Deb
10-18-2004, 02:11 PM
It is really tough, however, I do not believe that glued fittings are the thing to use.
I would glue a threaded trap adapter on the pipe coming from the wall, near the wall and use PVC tubular fittings for everything under the sink--inexpensive and easy to work with. They also come apart to facilitate cleaning out the p-trap (that will end up with "stuff" in it).
Deb
The Pipewench

hj
10-18-2004, 03:21 PM
If you glued everything together, you spent way too much time and money doing the drain under the sink. It is possible to reuse some parts, but it takes time and special tools, so by the time you finished you would have spent a lot more time and money, in addition to what you already invested, and will still have a sub-par drain system. Cut out everything, except the pipe going into the wall and convert it to tubing sized connections using slip nuts.

Watertec
10-29-2004, 05:12 PM
In response to the original question....no pvc pipe cannot be removed from glued fittings.

To the other point of using tubular fittings (ESPECIALLY under a kitchen sink)....I prefer using glued fittings with a single nut trap, filling the threaded groove with pipe joint compound, flanged tailpieces and trap adapters at the strainers.

My preference is a result of seeing hot water softening the tubular products (coupled with the struggle to find QUALITY tubular products) to the point of failure.

Using trap adapters and "nutted" sch 40 traps allows for the removal, and reinstalling of the accessible piping WITHOUT the resulting softening problem.

hj
10-29-2004, 08:25 PM
I have never seen a "softening" problem in a residential sink system. What are you running through the ones that you have seen? Steam? If it softens tubular it will also soften sch 40 pipes.

Watertec
10-30-2004, 06:34 AM
At the risk of sounding sarcastic, I'm assuming since YOU haven't experienced it, it COULDN'T possibly exist under normal conditions?

Steam? No 140 degree water will do the trick, and I've been involved in repairing many kitchen sink drains with tubular plastic lines that had softened, and, as a result, deformed or simply pulled apart at the compression fitting.

You WILL note that I also commented that finding QUALITY tubular products was a problem, indicating that if one could theoretically improve existing quality (longer insert lengths in compression ftgs), one may decrease the likelyhood of temperature failures.

It is my professional opinion that a sch40 drain assy, installed as I described is NOT a waste of money OR time, and , in fact, provides a superior (not inferior, as was indicated by another poster.....you?) installation.

hj
10-30-2004, 06:44 AM
Not to question your observations, but I have been installing plastic slip drains since they became available, and have never experienced the effect you describe. Even in commercial installations where 160 degree water can be the norm. Maybe "big box" drain material is not as durable as that available to the professional plumber.

Deb
10-30-2004, 11:46 AM
I have never seen or had a softening problem either (no sarcasm needed). I am not saying that it never happens, but I have never seen it (and I have a grandma that I cannot get to quit pouring boiling water down her drains) and until I run into it enough to be considered a problem, I will continue to use the (quality plumbing supply house) products I have been using. :D
Deb
The Pipewench

Watertec
11-01-2004, 03:18 AM
Contrary to anyone's intimations I have 25 years experience in residential service plumbing.

I do NOT spend large shares of my supply dollar at "big box" retail stores, primarily shopping at the major plumbing wholesalers in the Baltimore area.

I stumbled upon this sight seeking advice for a BOCA code question, and thought in the process I'd offer my own observations.

You may choose to acknowledge those observations as credible or not.

hj
11-01-2004, 04:22 AM
I have 50 years in Chicago and Phoenix, and if it has happened to you, then it is something we have never encountered.

Watertec
11-01-2004, 01:52 PM
Not to continue any argument, but it does appear as if you and Deb have summarily dismissed MY observations as amateurish, at best.

I assumed this was a site, and subject, worthy of my commentary based on the fact that tubular waste assemblies are widespread. YOUR comment was they were a waste of time and money.

My observations, based on 25 years of PROFESSIONAL experience disagree.

Obviously there is some sort of prerequisite to this site qualifying one as worthy of respect.

I apologize for not adhering.

hj
11-01-2004, 03:50 PM
You have a thin skin. We did not represent them as amateurish, but based on our experiences, we have never seen it happen. Plastic tubular drains are, as you say, widespread, and if this were an ongoing problem, either codes would not permit them, or plumbers would not install them due to the persistent call backs it would engender. If it is widespread in your area, so be it, but in many cases a few incidents are extrapolated into a major industry concern.

jimbo
11-01-2004, 05:23 PM
Just checking to see who's awake!

e-plumber
11-01-2004, 07:41 PM
Just checking to see who's awake!

Sylvan Who? :confused:

n6750g
06-01-2008, 12:05 PM
Take a dremel tool with a cutting disc. Cut the joint piece off about an inch above the place where the pipe is bottomed out so you have something to hold onto. Cut lengthwise one either side down through the joining piece being careful not to cut into the pipe you are going to reuse. Holding onto the pipe below, take some channel locks and slowly peel the halves off the weld. It's important you hold firmly so you aren't stressing welds further down the pipe. Once off, make sure to sand the old cement off and reuse. I've done this a few times without any problems.

jimbo
06-01-2008, 04:38 PM
Well, since this thread is already over FOUR YEARS OLD, why not keep it going!

For n6750, your procedure works with black ABS, but I have not been successful trying to do that with PVC.

hj
06-01-2008, 07:19 PM
You really don't want to know. If you think some of the current responders are sarastic, you would think they are the picture of decorum if he ever came in here. He has ABSOLUTELY no sympathy for DIYers, and thinks they should all be run out of town.

jimbo
06-02-2008, 07:04 AM
We do remember sylvan, and suspect he was related to the electrician Joe T!

Bill Arden
06-02-2008, 03:26 PM
Well, since this thread is already over FOUR YEARS OLD, why not keep it going!

For n6750, your procedure works with black ABS, but I have not been successful trying to do that with PVC.

I ended up having to do that once with CPVC as the CPVC fitting cracked and I did not want to remove the wall to get at the pipe.

It was tricky and took a bit of cutting, but I saved the end of the pipe and was able to glue on a new end.

PS: I wonder why really old threads like this pop back up once in a blue moon.

fixdrain345
11-11-2009, 12:19 AM
Dear Forum,

I am a DIY'er or at least try to fix things around the home on my own if I can but take wise approaches as you can see I am here in this forum to get some advice. Anyway from what I have read so far I really liked the suggestion from DEB and everyone else who had no problems in going with PVC tubular fittings.

First the leak is about 5 inches from where the pipe runs through the wall. Everything seems to be glued together all the fittings expect for the part that attaches to the garbage disposal and alternate sink. I am thinking about cutting the pipe close to the wall and glueing a threaded trap adapter to the pipe that is coming from the wall. Than get a set of new pipes, pvc tubular fittings that have adapters unlike the tubes that are on there know which are glued.

Wish me luck, any other suggestions, if I get stuck I will be back.
I was also thinking of just cutting the pipe by wall and with some of sticking out cut at where the leak stops and attaching a Drain & Trap Connector Coupling or a proplex coupling to hold the pipes together (what does everyone think about that) Do they make couplings in longer sizes around 7-10 inches??? Will this also be a good quick fix.

Thanks everyone good nite....

Bencher
11-29-2009, 01:10 AM
Well - I don't consider myself as very handy - But I will say that I thought some of the "experts" on here might be missing something.

I installed a dual kitchen sink about a year ago that replaced my single tub. I think that Watertec was spot on here in that I should have installed and glued ABS right from the start. I used compression type fittings that due to having to clear various things (Like an under sink garbage can) had about 10 connections. Over the past year - these connections would come loose and water would soak everything under the sink.

No doubt these loose fittings came unscrewed due to pipes getting bumped while retrieving cleaning supplies stored under the sink....but even connections like to the drain trap came loose.

By using Glued ABS pipe - I eliminated 5 of the compression connections and could probably play drums on the pipes without anything coming loose. There is no question in my mind that for strength - A permanent (Bonded) connection beats a compression fitting hands down!

Redwood
11-29-2009, 05:28 AM
I wonder why really old threads like this pop back up once in a blue moon.

Someone doing a Google search finds it then joins and ads their 2 cents bumping it to the top...

Or, a spammer comes along and drops a link thinking it will remain obscure....

Redwood
11-29-2009, 05:30 AM
Well - I don't consider myself as very handy - But I will say that I thought some of the "experts" on here might be missing something.

I installed a dual kitchen sink about a year ago that replaced my single tub. I think that Watertec was spot on here in that I should have installed and glued ABS right from the start. I used compression type fittings that due to having to clear various things (Like an under sink garbage can) had about 10 connections. Over the past year - these connections would come loose and water would soak everything under the sink.

No doubt these loose fittings came unscrewed due to pipes getting bumped while retrieving cleaning supplies stored under the sink....but even connections like to the drain trap came loose.

By using Glued ABS pipe - I eliminated 5 of the compression connections and could probably play drums on the pipes without anything coming loose. There is no question in my mind that for strength - A permanent (Bonded) connection beats a compression fitting hands down!

When I install tubular I'd like to ensure you that it will be every bit as long lasting as a glued in drain.

Call it the pro's touch!

hj
11-29-2009, 07:23 AM
quote; I used compression type fittings that due to having to clear various things (Like an under sink garbage can) had about 10 connections.

THAT is neither a common type of installation, nor a wise one. There is no way that many connections should be needed if the proper fittings were used, namely, NONE with slip joints on both ends. BUT if you have that many slip connections, there is NO Way to make it rigid enough not to fall apart. As a practical matter, a slip joint installation should have taken EXACTLY the same number of fittings as a glued one used., the only difference being how they were connected together.