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Glenf
01-25-2009, 04:54 PM
I am removing the gas cooktop, replacing it with a free standing gas range. The gas line currently enters the cabinet about 18" from the floor - far to high for a range! I need to remove the gas line and valve and mount it closer too the floor and not sticking out 6" into the area where the range will be. I'd like to install a gas outlet box in the wall to mount the valve. Who makes a gas line box that is suitable for a remodel installation?

GabeS
01-25-2009, 05:42 PM
Behind the free standing range there is an indentation area for the gas line to sit in. The specs on the range will show that. The pipe comes out of the wall and then an elbow to keep it close to the wall so it fits in that indentation area. This way you could push the range against the wall.

frenchie
01-25-2009, 06:32 PM
And the indent is NOT down by the floor. It's high enough that a person can lean over the stove, and reach down to turn it off, before pulling out the stove when it's time to replace it.

Glenf
01-25-2009, 07:21 PM
I'll have to go down and measure the range again to see if an 18" high pipe will clear the rear of the stove. An elbow, then the valve would certainly be easier!

GabeS
01-26-2009, 07:03 AM
If you are buying a new stove check the specs on that one too. They are all different.

Frenchie,

How can you reach over if the stove is against the wall? I'm tall and I stil can't do it. Not sure what you mean.

When you disconnect the stove, first you pull it all the way out(flexible must be long enough to do that) then you disconnect it, no?

Glenf
01-26-2009, 07:36 AM
If you are buying a new stove check the specs on that one too. They are all different.

Frenchie,

How can you reach over if the stove is against the wall? I'm tall and I stil can't do it. Not sure what you mean.

When you disconnect the stove, first you pull it all the way out(flexible must be long enough to do that) then you disconnect it, no?

I'd guess that he must climb up onto the counter, unless he used to play basketball!:rolleyes:

frenchie
01-26-2009, 10:11 AM
Pull the stove 5-6" from the wall, and then just lean over it. Stick your arm down the back, you can usually reach the valve & turn it off. Then pull it the rest of the way & disconnect, etc.

It's just what an inspector told me, when I asked how come the rough-out's always so high off the floor.

Glenf
01-27-2009, 06:53 AM
I am removing the gas cooktop, replacing it with a free standing gas range. The gas line currently enters the cabinet about 18" from the floor - far to high for a range! I need to remove the gas line and valve and mount it closer too the floor and not sticking out 6" into the area where the range will be. I'd like to install a gas outlet box in the wall to mount the valve. Who makes a gas line box that is suitable for a remodel installation?

My wife has decided on a Whirlpool 5-burner range from Lowes. Their installation instructions do indicate that the gas outlet must be within 17" of the floor so I am going to have to lower it a bit (probably comes down from the attic) by adding a nipple and probably a couple of elbows. The burner outputs on this range are: 2 - 14,000 BTU; 1 - 9,500 BTU; 1 - 5,000 BTU simmer; 1 - 8,000 BTU center. The instructions say: "Provide a gas supply line of 3/4" rigid pipe to the range location. A smaller size pipe on longer runs may result in insufficient gas supply". The run is approximately 80' from the meter, which I would consider 'longer'! The inlet to the stove takes a 1/2" pipe. Let's assume that the oven is running. How many of those burners can I run successfully with that 1/2" supply line that currently goes to the cooktop?

jimbo
01-27-2009, 07:05 AM
You have about 50,000+ BTU on the burners. That is right at about the limit of 80' of 1/2" pipe. What about the oven? If there was a 50,000 BTU oven on the line, that puts you at the limit of a 3/4" pipe.

Glenf
01-27-2009, 07:13 AM
That tells me that if the entire run is 1/2" and the oven is on, we can't use the burners or if all of the burners are on (unlikely) that we can't use the oven! I'd guess that I'll have to climb up into the atic and measure that pipe size as it may just be the stub out of the wall that is 1/2". Thanks for your input. I'll climb up there and measure after breakfast as tomorrow I go in for surgery and won't feel like doing the attic thing for a few days.:eek:

Glenf
01-27-2009, 01:31 PM
Ok, I climbed my old, tired body up into the attic and found that the majority of the run is 1" from the meter which feeds the Trane 1600i (90,000 BTU fed with a 1/2" pipe) up on the roof; the gas fireplace (21,600 BTU) fed with a 3/8" pipe; and the gas cooktop (to be replaced by the range). From that 1" is a 1/2" which runs about 10' horizontally across the trusses, then down 7' or so to the valve for the cooktop. Whirlpool tells me that the range will operate with anywhere from 5" WC to 14" WC at the inlet of the regulator. Our local gas company tells me that they supply natural gas at 7" WC. My thought is that, since only the last 17' or so is 1/2" and my wife will not have more than a couple of burners on if the oven is going, that we may be OK with what we have. The cost of upgrading that attic pipe and down pipe to 3/4" would probably defeat the idea of a new gas range:mad:

What do you think??

TedL
01-27-2009, 05:44 PM
If it's even close to capacities shown in the tables, give it a shot. From what you've said, you're not really adding to the work involved if you have to go back and upgrade the line after the fact (like if you had walls wide open). How long is the 1/2 supply to the Trane, that presumably works fine?

Glenf
01-27-2009, 05:53 PM
It's probably about 20 feet. The high input on the Trane is 120,000 BTU and the low is 90,000 BTU. The specs for it call for 1/2" line. It has performed flawlessly! Thanks for your comments.:)