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quinocampa
01-20-2009, 06:33 PM
Is there anything one would encounter in a remodeling project that has to be done by a licensed plumber or electrician to be legal? A friend had that idea, but I thought it was bunk. Also, what about permits? I chose to do a bathroom remodel, removing all fixtures and going back to the studs. I've added new electrical components and moved plumbing in the process. I'll finish with a heated floor, tiled shower, and all new fixtures and cabinets. I'm guessing the scope would require a permit. On the other hand, if everything is done correctly, where is the fault?

Thank you!

jimbo
01-20-2009, 06:55 PM
For sure, the scope you describe would require a permit in almost any jurisdiction. The rules for that vary a lot. Massachusetts is maybe the toughest...absolutely NO PLUMBING WORK OF ANY KIND...without a license. Not sure about electrical. I know some states require a homeowner to take a basic knowledge test to qualify for self permits.

California is possibly the most lenient of any place, except outlying areas which maybe have no permit requirements. In CA, a homeowner can pretty much get a permit to build a nuclear reactor, if they think they can pass the inspection.

Terry
01-20-2009, 06:57 PM
Any plumbing or electrical in that situation would have needed permits and inspections to be legal.

Insurance companies are funny that way too.

Scuba_Dave
01-20-2009, 07:15 PM
It seems to differ by the Town in MA as far as electrical
I am allowed to do my own work, anything they find that is not to code they can require I hire an electrician to fix it
I can't get my hands wet, but I can electrocute myself ;)

Yes, a permit would be required almost everywhere
In case of a fire your insurance company may refuse your claim when they find out a permit was not pulled. What you think may be right, may not

I do know a guy who lives out on a couple hundred acres of land out west that has never seen an Inspector. But when you have neighbors that when your electrical fire burns their house down too the powers that be have a problem. And if that does happen you could be liable out of pocket for all damages if your Insurance company refuses to pay due to lack of a permit/inspection

Laws vary by State. One homeowner here did what you did. It didn't meet code, when it was discovered (not sure how) the homeowner was forced to gut it & have it rebuilt by Pro's correctly

One neighbor called the Inspector on another neighbor on our street doing work without a permit

I know enough about plumbing that when my plumber told me he had to do A, B & C I said fine do it

jadnashua
01-20-2009, 07:31 PM
Where I live, there's a difference between single family dwellings and multiple ones...some things require a pro, some do not, but all require permits and inspections.

quinocampa
01-20-2009, 08:34 PM
Any plumbing or electrical in that situation would have needed permits and inspections to be legal.

Insurance companies are funny that way too.

I am by no means done. What can be done after the work has been started?

C NUMB
01-21-2009, 03:25 AM
Down here in Florida remodels/additions require permit. If you are just replacing fixtures in the same location you are fine,with the exception of water heaters and shower pans. I have seen some folks here have an issue when trying to sell them home after doing non-permitted jobs in their home, it comes back to bite them.

CarlH
01-21-2009, 05:00 AM
I am by no means done. What can be done after the work has been started?

The important part is the inspection. That will confirm that you did the work correctly. Get the permits and then call to have the work inspected. Hopefully, you have not covered up the plumbing and electrical work yet.

jimbo
01-21-2009, 07:17 AM
Get the permits sooner, rather than later. Some inspections have to be staged. For example, rough plumbing or electrical will require an inspection and testing BEFORE any drywall or other finish work goes up, and then maybe a final. If you have any structural work, there will be stucture, insulation, and final inspections.

Cookie
01-21-2009, 07:19 AM
What happens if you miss the final inspection Jim? But, you did the rest.
I am posing this question because it is something I am sure some others here have wondered.
Which I don't have the answer to either.