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jwelectric
12-30-2008, 10:36 PM
From time to time I get some information via email just because of what I do for a living.

Any of you who might have bought a How To book lately should check out this link

click here (http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09078.html)

jar546
12-31-2008, 05:17 AM
Just found this through another source this morning. This is what jw is pointing to:

This is one more fine example of why electrical safety is so important and you really need to understand what you are doing.

Faulty Instructions Prompt Recall of Electrical Wiring How-to-Books by The Taunton Press; Shock Hazard to Consumers
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed.

jar546
12-31-2008, 05:48 AM
Cookie,

You are running off on a tangent with this one. This is a very good example of how dangerous DIY with electrical can be and please re-read my statement.


This is one more fine example of why electrical safety is so important and you really need to understand what you are doing.


I never said DIY should not be done. No matter who you are, you need to know what you are doing, especially with electrical work. Comparing electrical to teaching school is a very poor example. One minor error in electrical work can cause a death. I am rather taken back that you choose to minimalize the importance of this.

Rather than act as an attorney for the DIY folks, how about taking this lesson at face value by understanding and appreciating this important information that is being shared.

Too many people are trying to make a buck by selling DIY books and money hungry publishers are quick to put them in the big box stores with very little oversight.

Every 3 years a new NEC version comes out after a constant ongoing process involving thousands, yes thousands of experts who evaluate and re-evaluate the safety of the public. The NEC is over 100 years old and it is constantly changing. Before one word is changed it takes a major evaluation and acceptance. Not the case with some moron who wants to show people how to do things wrong.

Whether you stated it or not, your post is minimalizing electrical safety. Don't lose sight of safety to ring the DIY bell.

Cookie
12-31-2008, 05:59 AM
I knew you were going to say that. :)

I absolutely did not miminize the danger, danger, of electrical.
To be honest with you Jeff, you are alittle off tangent.
I was married to an EE for nearly 30 years, and he would agree, education is the key to safety.

Have a nice day.

hj
12-31-2008, 06:15 AM
And do you really believe ONLY electrical books have errors in them. Most of the DIY books are probably written by guys, and gals, who have read other books, but never did any real work.

Cookie
12-31-2008, 06:26 AM
[quote=jar546;175143]

I never said DIY should not be done. No matter who you are, you need to know what you are doing, especially with electrical work.
quote]

How do you propose they learn?

jimbo
12-31-2008, 06:41 AM
Just curious....if any one has one of those books, can you post an example of the errors? I am thinking there must be some pretty egregious stuff in there to prompt CPSC action!

jwelectric
12-31-2008, 07:12 AM
How do you propose they learn?

Cookie the books that the CPSC has recalled have some very serious life safety issues in the text.
The text tells someone how to wire something where all metal is carrying current. Wouldn’t you think it nice to arise in the morning and stroll into the kitchen to fix you some breakfast and while the eggs was frying in the skillet you are going to make you a pot of coffee. When you reach to turn on the water you can’t let go of the facet.

Those eggs would just sit in that pan and burn and that would be a waste of good eggs not to mention that there might not be any more Cookie for us here and that would be nothing short of tragic.

Being in the electrical construction for over 40 years I think it would be fair for me to say that I have taught thousands of people a little something about electrical installations.

After old Author moved into my knees, hips and shoulders I had to give up field work and took on the role of instructor at the local community college where I have been teaching for 9 years. I think that if there is anyone on this site that can address the education of some of the task asked about on this forum I would be well qualified to make a judgment call as to whether or not the person asking the question could handle the job.

I agree that education is the key but some things can not be taught through self help books and can’t even come close to being covered on some DIY web site.
Working in the field as well as answering question on these DIY web sites any experience electrician can easily see that most of the DITer is just looking to make it work. Once it is working then in their mind it is right,

In one of those books that is being recalled the author is telling the DIYer that a metal water pipe can be used as the return path for current. In other words the metal water pipes is being used for a conductor.

Now ask any of the plumbers on this site just what they think about this type of installation. Remember that it will work so in the mind of most DIYer it must be right.
.

If someone wants to learn how to install a service let him/her go to their local community college where they will have some one on one instead of just coming to a web site and asking what kind of panel they need to buy.

Now being the wife of an electrical engineer do you think that he obtained his knowledge by asking a few questions on a web site? I bet he spent a lot of hours in a classroom. Some of the questions that are asked on this site would require the person to spend many classroom hours in order to learn about all the things that they are not asking about.

jwelectric
12-31-2008, 07:16 AM
Just curious....if any one has one of those books, can you post an example of the errors? I am thinking there must be some pretty egregious stuff in there to prompt CPSC action!

How about useing the metal water pipe for a return path for a circuit.

One example is that when changing from a three wire recrptacle to a four wire receptacle for a range or dryer a metal water pipe can be used for the new white wire.

This means that the metal water pipe is carrying current. Wouldn't you love to work on that system?

jwelectric
12-31-2008, 07:43 AM
How do you both propose people learn so they know what they are doing? I am surprised by you both. People are going to do things thereselves no matter what. That is what makes this forum necessary.

With some things like changing a light bulb or a fuse we can give a lot of help.

With things such as a service panel there is no way they can LEAEN close to enough on a discussion forum such as this one.

For some installations I recomment a course at the local community college.

I am suprised that the wife of an electrical engineer would think that someone could obtain enouth knowledge to design and install an electrical system by asking questions on a web site.

We have no way of testing the person to see if they are ready to move on the the next level so what we are doing is helping someone get hrut, hurt soemone else, or burn down their house.

Cookie
12-31-2008, 07:50 AM
I never said they could obtain enough knowledge to do all things. Read my VERY first post again. Then read it again. You will see... something I said in it, about figuring out they, a DIY'er, will need a Pro.

Do you see it? :D
Don't read so quick guys, slow down, read what is being written before you jump.

jimbo
12-31-2008, 08:02 AM
How about useing the metal water pipe for a return path for a circuit.

One example is that when changing from a three wire recrptacle to a four wire receptacle for a range or dryer a metal water pipe can be used for the new white wire.

This means that the metal water pipe is carrying current. Wouldn't you love to work on that system?


WOW! They really put that in a book? Hope that publisher had lots of insurance!

Billy_Bob
12-31-2008, 08:09 AM
So far as learning new things and books go, I like to get three books on the same subject by different authors/publishers. I learn the most this way.

With just one book, something might not be explained very well and I don't understand it. Then the second book with explain the same thing differently and I will then understand it. And sometimes two books will give conflicting advice, then the 3rd will confirm something should be done one way or another.

Also the important stuff is drilled into my head three times by reading three books.

BTW I read a LOT and it is not uncommon to see mistakes in books. (Frequently toward the back.) I think the proof readers get tired after going through the first part of the book and are not so careful with the rest.

220/221
12-31-2008, 08:24 AM
How do you both propose people learn so they know what they are doing?

IMO, homeowners and handymen should not do electrical work. The learning curve is too great.

I do a lot of service work and base my opinion on what I see every day.

If your plumbing leaks, things get wet. If your electricity leaks, things get burned and killed.

Cookie
12-31-2008, 08:27 AM
Some plumbers die each year from things electricians do.

Cookie
12-31-2008, 08:40 AM
From time to time I get some information via email just because of what I do for a living.

Any of you who might have bought a How To book lately should check out this link

click here (http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09078.html)

I clicked there and I would like your opinion if this guy is an expert or not?

http://www.linkedin.com/in/mcalistermichael

Wet_Boots
12-31-2008, 09:22 AM
Despite the back-and-forth, there are still no actual examples of the errors that led to the book's recall. Absent actual examples, one could suspect production errors on the publisher's part, if it were diagrams alone that were at fault.

I once contributed some knowledge to a how-to book, by way of conversing with the author by phone. My trust of how accurate information can get lost in translation is such, that my response to the author's offer to include my name in the "thank-you to...." section was "Like hell you will."

jwelectric
12-31-2008, 09:30 AM
Just one more question, has there ever been a mistake published in the NEC code book? The teacher should know the answer to this one... :D

Now I am outta here for a new year pretzel, :D

Many many times and it is always addressed as soon as it is found. Most of the mistakes are typos and page numbering.

In the history of the NFPA there has never been a life safety issue printed.

The code making process is a long drawn out affair.

At the beginning of each code cycle (we will use the 2008) for the first few months there is what is called the proposal stage. Any one can make a proposal to have something in the code changed. In the proposal the reason for the change must be substantiated why the change is needed. This substantiation must be valid and life safety issues are a major reason for the change.

These proposals are then sent to one of the 20 Code Making Panels for their review. Here these 15 to 20 people will pick apart the proposal to see if it conflicts with some other part of the NEC and then they vote.

This vote will result in one of the following;
Reject: The panel can reject the proposal for any number of reasons. The panel will make a comment on why they rejected the proposal. I use this information quite often in the classroom.

Accept in part: The code panel might see that part of the proposal is good but part is not so good and then vote to accept it in part. Here they will again give the reason why only part was accepted.

Accept in principal: The code panel may see that the idea of the submitter was good but the wording was bad. Remember when the codes are adopted by a state or city they become law so the wording is very important. Again the panel will give a reason

Accept: here the code panel just accepts the proposal as it is written

After all this takes place the Report on Proposals are sent to those who made a proposal and then the next cycle starts.

The comment stage;
During the comment stage any one can make a comment on any proposal that has been voted on. This process goes on for a couple of months before everything is complied into the new code.

For the 2008 code cycle I made five proposals. Four were accepted either fully or in part. One was rejected but I did get an informal ruling on what the intent of that particular code sections was.

As you can see the NEC is not just written by a bunch of tie wearing people sitting around in the office with nothing else to do. The NEC is written by people just like you and me.

Below is an example of a proposal that may have conflicted with another part of the NEC and the action taken by the Code Panel.
This was my proposal

1-39 Log #1299 NEC-P01 Final Action: Accept in Principle
(100.Lighting Outlet)
__________________________________________________ ___________
TCC Action: It was the action of the Technical Correlating Committee that this Proposal be referred to Code-Making Panels 2 and 18 for comment.
Submitter: Joseph Whitt, JW Electric
Recommendation: Revise text to read:
Lighting Outlet. An outlet intended for the direct connection of a permanently installed, cord and plug connected lampholder, a luminaire (lighting fixture), or a pendant cord terminating in a lampholder.
Substantiation: As worded, a lighting outlet would require a direct connection to the premises wiring. This could be interpreted to mean that the luminary would be required to be installed to a box with wire nuts which would leave out a cord and plug connected luminary as outlined in 410.30. This would also negate Exception No. 1 of 210.70(A)(1).
This would also clear up the confusion for inspectors and electrical contractors as to whether a receptacle used for the sole purpose to supply current to a luminary is a lighting outlet or not. This will help in clearing up the confusion over the use and switching of small appliance and laundry receptacles for permanently installed under cabinet luminaries.
As an instructor of inspector classes in the state of North Carolina, I see those inspectors coming through my classes are split about fifty/fifty on this issue. This issue needs clarity.
Panel Meeting Action: Accept in Principle
Revise the definition to read as follows:
“Lighting Outlet. An outlet intended for the connection of a lampholder, a luminaire (lighting fixture), or a pendant cord terminating in a lampholder.
Panel Statement: The panel concludes this action meets the intent of the submitter. CMP-1 agrees that the definition may conflict with the requirement in 410.30(C)(1) and other code sections that allow for the use of attachment plugs for the connection of luminaires. CMP-1 disagrees that the existing definition negates 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1. CMP-1 has revised the definition by deleting the word “direct.” The panel recommends that the TCC forward this action to CMP-18.
Number Eligible to Vote: 12
Ballot Results: Affirmative: 12
__________________________________________________ ___________

Ian Gills
12-31-2008, 09:59 AM
You guys are just all reading the wrong books.

This is my source for most of the work I do and I know Jar546 uses it ;).

(Give it time to load - 23 megs).

http://ia340902.us.archive.org/3/items/constructionofsm00walsrich/constructionofsm00walsrich.pdf

Redwood
12-31-2008, 03:18 PM
Good ole Rex Cauldwell of Taunton Press

I thought I remembered the name!
What a Blooming Idiot!
Here's his bio page on the web... Rex Cauldwell Bio Page (http://ltmtnele.tripod.com/mybio/)
Seems to be under construction and the links selling the books aren't working.:eek:
Try searching for the name of the business that he claims to run in his bio...
I couldn't get it to come up in several different searches I did.

He wrote a how to plumb book too! Here is an article he wrote for Fine Homebuilding Magazine http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/how-to/articles/better-undersink-plumbing.aspx?ac=ts&ra=fp on how to plumb the drains under a kitchen sink better too. Take a look at the picture below and see if you see anything wrong with it... It should be good for a belly laugh! Sorry about the bad copy but I was not going to buy it to get you a better view.

Redwood
12-31-2008, 03:23 PM
So far as learning new things and books go, I like to get three books on the same subject by different authors/publishers. I learn the most this way.

With just one book, something might not be explained very well and I don't understand it. Then the second book with explain the same thing differently and I will then understand it. And sometimes two books will give conflicting advice, then the 3rd will confirm something should be done one way or another.

Also the important stuff is drilled into my head three times by reading three books.

BTW I read a LOT and it is not uncommon to see mistakes in books. (Frequently toward the back.) I think the proof readers get tired after going through the first part of the book and are not so careful with the rest.


These books that Taunton Press publishes are hacker guides at best.
I sincerely doubt the credentials of the authors. The stuff they write is just too unbelievable!

Redwood
12-31-2008, 04:15 PM
Here is what I could find about Michael Litchfield

http://www.nahww.org/content.aspx?page_id=80&club_id=493314&member_id=45824

Here's what I came up with for Michael Mcalister...
http://www.infinitesmile.org/:D

Seriously this is what I found.
http://www.buildersbooksource.com/cgi-bin/booksite/24390.html

Maybe I should make up a webpage listing my credentials:D

Redwood
12-31-2008, 04:21 PM
I clicked there and I would like your opinion if this guy is an expert or not?

http://www.linkedin.com/in/mcalistermichael

Cookie In think if this was the same guy that is writing books for Taugton Press they would have written a little more than He's an electrician.

hj
01-01-2009, 06:15 AM
I once saw one with a very complicated 3 way switch wiring, where the switches were breaking the neutral wire.

CarlH
01-01-2009, 06:49 AM
Take a look at the picture below and see if you see anything wrong with it... It should be good for a belly laugh! Sorry about the bad copy but I was not going to buy it to get you a better view.

Is that an AAV way down low? Hard to tell from the picture.

DW drain without an airgap, but at least there is a high loop.

Are those rubber fittings kosher? Also, there seems to be a lot more junctions in the revised job than there were in the original. I guess the rubber fittings allow you to remove the trap since I can't tell how that PVC is put together. The trap configuration now looks more like an S trap than a P trap. I see comments regarding the use of an S trap. What's wrong with S traps?

At least that is what these DIY homeowner eyes can see.

GabeS
01-01-2009, 07:56 AM
Redwood,

I actually read that article and used it under one of my kitchen sinks. The idea was to keep the piping towards the back away from damage and also to increase the drain size coming off the strainer by using a pvc fitting on the outside instead of a washer would collects dirt and closes the opening a little.

I'd like to hear all of your points on what is wrong with that setup.

Bye the way I also read two other books by Rex and it says he's a licensed plumber and licensed electrician. Don't know if they would lie about that. The taunton does publish a lot of stuff. Never actually confirmed any of the information myself. But then again, I never confirmed the moon landing either.

Cookie
01-01-2009, 08:04 AM
Here is what I could find about Michael Litchfield

http://www.nahww.org/content.aspx?page_id=80&club_id=493314&member_id=45824

Here's what I came up with for Michael Mcalister...
http://www.infinitesmile.org/:D

Seriously this is what I found.
http://www.buildersbooksource.com/cgi-bin/booksite/24390.html

Maybe I should make up a webpage listing my credentials:D

Red,

Here is what I found on Michael Mcalister is yours and mine the same guy? Mine says electrical, studied at Berkely.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/mcalistermichael
This man is more than qualified, but yet co-authored the book in question.

jimbo
01-01-2009, 08:39 AM
One of the licence numbers listed in the link.....818870.. is inactive. The other CA contractors licenses are active and up to date, with bonds and workers comp posted.

Cookie
01-01-2009, 08:41 AM
Could be a typo.

Redwood
01-01-2009, 10:03 AM
Is that an AAV way down low? Hard to tell from the picture.

DW drain without an airgap, but at least there is a high loop.

Are those rubber fittings kosher? Also, there seems to be a lot more junctions in the revised job than there were in the original. I guess the rubber fittings allow you to remove the trap since I can't tell how that PVC is put together. The trap configuration now looks more like an S trap than a P trap. I see comments regarding the use of an S trap. What's wrong with S traps?

At least that is what these DIY homeowner eyes can see.

No, that is a cleanout plug it is not vented properly. Or, even vented with an AAV for that matter.

The requirement for an airgap is not required everywhere but it should be noted that it might be.

Those rubber fittings should be outlawed! They are far from being Kosher!

S-traps are just plain illegal and not to code. They cannot be properly vented.

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=6123&stc=1&d=1231290820

Redwood
01-01-2009, 10:14 AM
Redwood,

I actually read that article and used it under one of my kitchen sinks. The idea was to keep the piping towards the back away from damage and also to increase the drain size coming off the strainer by using a pvc fitting on the outside instead of a washer would collects dirt and closes the opening a little.

I'd like to hear all of your points on what is wrong with that setup.

Bye the way I also read two other books by Rex and it says he's a licensed plumber and licensed electrician. Don't know if they would lie about that. The taunton does publish a lot of stuff. Never actually confirmed any of the information myself. But then again, I never confirmed the moon landing either.

I think Rex Cauldwell is less like the moon landing and more like Roswell, New Mexico....

I would hook up the sink drain in the conventional manner with the pipes crossing over between the 2 sinks as high as possible to keep them up out of the way and avoid possible damage. I would also use slip joints to make it possible to disassembel for cleaning if needed.

http://terrylove.com/images/sink_dw.jpg

His methods are definitely hacker handyman at best.

Furd
01-01-2009, 10:38 AM
I find this very interesting. I purchased a copy of Mr. Cauldwell's book on inspecting a house at Half Price Books a few years ago. I was NOT impressed with the chapters on electricity, plumbing or heating systems.

Later I read on another website how the "For Pros By Pros" series of books were among the best a person could read and they especially recommended Mr. Cauldwell's book on wiring a home. I freakin' couldn't believe it! Of course, to be fair I must admit that every DIY type of book I have read has gotten at least on thing flat out wrong.

I'm an engineer but the title "engineer" means very little to me. I've known far too many "engineers" over the years that I wouldn't trust to oil the wheels on a kiddie car. I've known electrical engineers that couldn't plug in a toaster or change a light bulb and do it correctly. I've known mechanical engineers that couldn't grasp the simplest concepts of machinery. Yet many of these "engineers" not only had the degree but also a state-issued "Professional Engineer" license.

I've met tradesmen (and women) that claimed to have thirty years of experience but really had one year of experience thirty times over. I'm quite leery of ANYONE that has to brag about their degrees, licenses or years of experience. I've found out over the years that it is often the soft-spoken person that rarely pushes his (or her) thoughts onto others, and even more rarely cites any "qualifications" that is the person that REALLY knows what needs to be done and how to do it. Luckily, we have a number of these people on this board.

Thatguy
01-01-2009, 12:14 PM
Come to think of it, I've never seen any post-install testing instructions in DIY books.

Thatguy
01-01-2009, 12:30 PM
http://www.thatgirltv.com/

Hmmmm. . .what do you see in this inkblot?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rorschach_inkblot_test

Of course, when this show was on I wasn't even born yet, nor do I remember Kay Starr, Dion, Laugh-In, Three Mile Island, Nixon, etc., etc..
:D

Redwood
01-01-2009, 06:12 PM
Marlo Thomas is that girl!:D

Cass
01-01-2009, 06:20 PM
I can't stand her husband Phil Donahue...

Cass
01-01-2009, 06:38 PM
I love the work she does with what her father, Danny Thomas , started.

It is really a great thing for children..

kingsotall
01-01-2009, 08:20 PM
Even though this thread has gone way off topic I think the original post was spot on and information on recalled books as such can only benefit Terry's forum. I want to be kept informed by other tradesman such as threads like these.

Cookie
01-02-2009, 04:27 AM
Kingman,

That is why I suggested having a spot telling about bad books and good books. Kind of like in some video stores a video recommendation, but instead a book recommendation. What do you think? It kind of goes with your idea of citing recalled books, wouldn't you agree?

rgsgww
01-02-2009, 08:32 PM
I have some clue, but not much, about what you people are talking about (the off topic posts) because I'm am alot younger than all of you.

I've read some diy books that I've had for a few years, though I never use them, because I don't have to.

Some of the information is incorrect, and seems to make its way to other books, like "cheater plugs". In the books they say you can use them if you have conduit or bx, problem is, they don't mention bonding strips, what if the bx doesn't have a bonding strip? This creates a hazard.

Terry
01-03-2009, 12:40 PM
Maybe that should put a disclaimer on The Bible too.
Follow it's advice at your own risk.

That book uses a lot of writers too.

GabeS
01-04-2009, 07:08 AM
What are all the things wrong with rex's setup under the sink?

I thought AAV's were allowed in some jurisdictions.

99k
01-04-2009, 08:16 AM
Caveat emptor ... let the buyer beware when purchasing how-to books. I will say that I live very close to Taunton Press, know one of the editiors, and have purchased many of their books. Some of the books on decks, stairbuilding, framing, etc are fantastic ... it really isn't fair to broadbrush all the how-to books they publish as garbage ... they are one of the leading publishers. There are several problems, first Taunton Press better start having some of the info in these trade books verified by qualified professionals and second, DIYers must learn their limitations! Sometimes I will answer a DIYer request on this forum with "I suggest you hire a pro" because this is not a job for a DIYer ...

Thatguy
01-04-2009, 09:29 AM
Rex Cauldwell seems to be on a "competence trip"; maybe his editors and publisher let him down.
:confused:

Redwood
01-04-2009, 02:33 PM
What are all the things wrong with rex's setup under the sink?

I thought AAV's were allowed in some jurisdictions.

Show me an AAV in that picture!

GabeS
01-06-2009, 11:37 AM
Right above the rubber tee before the last piece of visible drain. That's an AAV.

What else do you see wrong?

I'm asking because I used that setup in my kitchen and want to know what I need to change and why?

If you would be so kind.

Thanks in advance.;)

GabeS
01-10-2009, 07:34 PM
Redwood,

You still out there?

hj
01-11-2009, 06:46 AM
I was talking to a printer friend one time because he had made an error on a publication and I needed to have him reprint a page for insertion. He showed me a book for a professional society and told me it had 35 closely spaced PAGES of errata that had to be inserted as an addendum with references. Few books, regardless of extensive proofreading, are error free. And given that "how to" books are usually quickly written by less than professional authors, and then proofed by readers who do not know the material, then printed some period of time after the original composition, they are seldom accurate or up to date.

GabeS
01-11-2009, 07:33 PM
Let's not forget that those books always say to get a permit with the local building department.

DavidTu
05-14-2010, 01:14 AM
After seeing these comments I went back to check out the Rex Cauldwell book and it does explain the details of his "better" kitchen sink drain design. A picture might be worth a 1000 words, but sometimes you do need the words too!

To be fair, I will relate the following from the written text accompanying the picture:

1) he specifically addresses that although it may look like an s-trap in the photo, it is not. the angle of the photo foreshortens the appearance of the connector between the p-trap and the vertical drop making the pipe length look shorter than it actually is. the pipe is 1.5" and he used the rule of being 2x pipe diameter so the connector pipe is at least 3" and he says the true measure is to the trap weir which is obviously longer than the connector itself. so he says it is not an s-trap and in any case since he calls it out himself and explains it in the text it is quite clear what one needs to do to avoid an s-trap.

2) he also addresses the issue of venting. the text explains that this is a real-world example and in this particular remodel there was not a previously installed kitchen drain vent. he lists three alternatives to dealing with this: a) plumbing a thru-the-roof vent pipe, (which he dismisses as too expensive to retrofit--at least on the example job) b) using an AAV, (which he says he might add, I think it was to the top of the double-wye) and c) that if the pipe is sufficientally upsized it allows for airflow over the flood level within the pipe. he goes on to say that this is local-code dependent and may not fly elsewhere (but apparently is ok where this example was implemented). so venting is actually addressed in the text.) the pipe is upsized to 2" for the vertical and then it connects in to a vented 3" pipe.

Anyway, as a DIYer I found some useful stuff in his books; elsewhere I recommended a book by Peter Hemp as my favorite (so far). i think the key for DIYers is to get several books based on recommendations and then to go online and ask for clarifications. The help on this site and others like it is invaluable. Besides the UPC code, I have 6 or 7 different books that I reference.