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BluesMan
11-08-2008, 02:43 PM
I just got a softener with the Clack-WS1 valve. The valve has 1" male threads coming out the back of the by-pass. i was planning on using pvc to pipe this in, but I know female pvc adapters are not allowed because they can crack. What can I use to connect up to these male threads? A brass coupling and male pvc adapter? I guess I could use a short peice of copper with a male and female adapter?

Any better ideas?

Gary Swart
11-08-2008, 02:52 PM
PVC should not be used for water lines inside the house. I would use copper.

BluesMan
11-08-2008, 02:54 PM
even if it's just cold water?

99k
11-08-2008, 04:24 PM
I just got a softener with the Clack-WS1 valve. The valve has 1" male threads coming out the back of the by-pass. i was planning on using pvc to pipe this in, but I know female pvc adapters are not allowed because they can crack. What can I use to connect up to these male threads? A brass coupling and male pvc adapter? I guess I could use a short peice of copper with a male and female adapter?

Any better ideas?

What type of plumbing material do you prefer? CPVC, PEX, Copper ... that will dictate your fitting.

BluesMan
11-08-2008, 04:59 PM
I have PEX running throughout the home, but no PEX crimper. I was planning on 1" PVC for just ease of installation because the fittings are 1"

It seems like copper is my next choice...i do have a "B" tank and turbo torch...so sweating is not an issue.

99k
11-08-2008, 05:12 PM
If your have PEX in your house, then stay with PEX. You can either buy a crimp tool for less than $100 (then sell it on ****) or use Sharkbites (they are more expensive but don't require a tool). At the softener, use a Female thread x 1" adaptor.

Southern Man
11-08-2008, 05:18 PM
If your have PEX in your house, then stay with PEX. You can either buy a crimp tool for less than $100 (then sell it on ****) or use Sharkbites (they are more expensive but don't require a tool). At the softener, use a Female thread x 1" adaptor.

A contractor suggested that I use sharkbites to extend the water lines in my new kitchen sink base. This would have put them under the cabinet floor and therefore inaccessible. He says that he uses them even inside walls. Was that good advice?

jadnashua
11-08-2008, 06:24 PM
They are code approved for hidden locations. A soldered connection is probably 20x cheaper.

nhmaster
11-08-2008, 07:27 PM
Here we go again. Helmet on..........

BluesMan
11-08-2008, 07:33 PM
I am installing the softener in my parents home. There is a section of 1" copper from the meter and then switches over to PEX and up to the manifold. I guess I should just shell out the dough for the crimper and be done with it....

burleymike
11-08-2008, 09:09 PM
You might be able to rent the crimper.

The plumbing supply house in town used to loan you the crimper if you bought fittings from them. After people started using them as hammers and leaving them in the back of their trucks they stopped loaning them out.

If I had a small job like that I would try to rent one before buying.

Southern Man
11-09-2008, 09:49 AM
They are code approved for hidden locations. A soldered connection is probably 20x cheaper. That's what I used. Of course though I used electrical solder just to get an asymmetrical reaction out some plumbers. :)