PDA

View Full Version : Bath Tub Drain Removal



Carob
03-28-2005, 10:16 AM
Hello.

I'm hoping someone might have an idea or two for me on this subject.

I have two bath tubs that have drains that need to be replaced. The problem is that I can't get them out. They are in such bad shape that the crossmembers are all busted off that the tub drain removal tool is supposed to use to unscrew and remove.

The suggestion that was given to me by Home Depot and Ace Hardware is to hammer a screwdriver (or something) into the side of the drain to use for leverage. I can't even manage to do that. (I can barely put a dent into it.) I thought about trying to drill a hole into the side of it but I'm scared to do that because I don't want to go through and damage the threads preventing putting a new one in.

Does anyone have any advice on how I can get these drains out and still be able to screw in new one?

Thanks very much!!!

RioHyde
03-28-2005, 10:23 AM
You could use a reciprocating saw with a bimetal blade. Stick the blade into the drain and cut a wedge out of the drain collar then pry it out. The trick here is to not cut the threads in the drain shoe which would present an entirely new set of problems. If you're not comfortable doing that you can also use a hacksaw blade instead of the recip. saw. It will take alot longer and you'll expend more energy, but sometimes "slow and steady wins the race".

Carob
03-28-2005, 10:31 AM
If I were to do that and "pry" it out wouldn't that damage the threads that the new drain would need to screw onto?

RioHyde
03-28-2005, 10:56 AM
not if you cut a wedge out of the drain collar itself by sticking the blade into the drain AND keep the blade away from the female threads of the drain shoe.

Carob
03-28-2005, 11:10 AM
Pardon my ignorance but I guess I'm confused.

But what is the purpose of cutting the wedge? For being able to pull the drain straight out or for giving a lip of some sort to put a screwdriver against to bang on to hopefully loosen it up? If it's the latter, okay I can see that. If it's the former I don't get it because how would it lift out if the threads from both pieces are holding it in?

RioHyde
03-28-2005, 02:15 PM
you'd be cutting the wedge out of the drain collar where the threads are (vertical area that penetrates the bathtub drain hole). The purpose would be to loosen the male threads of the drain collar from the female threads of the drain shoe. After that, you should be able to get a screwdriver or chisel in there to pry the male threads out of the female threads of the drain shoe.

Carob
03-28-2005, 02:21 PM
How bad is it if some of this metal falls down into the pipe? I would think it would be impossible to prevent all of the material from dropping when trying to saw with one hand and hold the piece with the other.

Terry
03-28-2005, 02:33 PM
That's what I like to do too, Though it helps when you've watched someone first.





http://www.azpartsmaster.com/Product...__PAS4500.aspx

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=12788&d=1302678647

http://www.azpartsmaster.com/Product...__PAS4500.aspx

RioHyde
03-28-2005, 02:34 PM
True, Terry. True. See one, do one, teach one. lol

Mike Swearingen
03-28-2005, 03:52 PM
I've always removed tub drains in this situation with a hacksaw blade, hammer and chisel (or flathead screwdriver), and a hair dryer.
Use a glove or cloth to hold a hacksaw blade and cut a small V-notch in the top inner edge of the drain above the threads.
Heat the drain with a hairdryer on "high heat" to soften the old plumber's putty under the drain lip.
Use the chisel or screwdriver in the notch to tap the drain around counter-clockwise to unscrew it. Won't harm the threads.
Works for me everytime.
Good Luck!
Mike

Terry
03-28-2005, 04:04 PM
Yeah, well, okay!

That sounds pretty good too Mike!
I can try that next time.

If you still have the cross in the drain, you can use the standard tool.

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=9182&stc=1&d=1260661299

raygunclan
03-28-2005, 06:07 PM
now, i am a self (and husband) professed remodel moron, but what about that spray that is supposed to help loosen things up? i read in another thread about removing a shower arm (which i'll be darned if i can do!) that there is a spray (maybe like a heavy duty wd40) that you spray in to loosen the threads. would this work in this situation? i'm still at the shower arm, but i'm working my way down to the faucet handles, which are stuck too!, to the shower drain (please don't let me have this same problem, the only saw we have is a chain saw to remove all the trees we lost in the hurricanes last year, and i'm not sure this is what i will need to use!).
would that spray be the ticket, and if so, would there be ANY excuse not to
ALWAYS have a can of this on hand?
sincerely,
using metal nail file instead of allen wrench
(c:

Carob
03-30-2005, 07:51 AM
Well, after cutting the notch large enough to put the head of a screwdriver in I started to pound away. After several minutes of banging away it seemed to move about 1/16". At that point I realised that the collar was splitting rather badly and stopped. The split is along the top of the collar and goes for about 1 1/4" around it. Now I don't know what to do.

Carob
03-30-2005, 10:19 AM
http://www.terrylove.com/images/dumbell_wrench.jpg
Can anyone explain how the "dumbell wrench" is supposed to be used when there are no crossmembers of the old drain left for the tool to grab onto? Supposedly this dumbell wrench is for drains that just won't come out, but, the end that is supposed to be used for tubs (the smaller end from what I can tell) just slides right in and spins around.

Don
04-06-2005, 06:28 PM
The use of a RotoZip with a small metal cutting wheel would give you the surgical precision to do this task even next to the human spine...but then..if you sent a picture , we may all know more about your situation..ain't that right fellas..Don

Mike Swearingen
04-06-2005, 07:38 PM
A tub drain "dumbell" will only work when a tub drain has the crosspieces for it to grip.
If using my method, you don't drive the chisel or screwdriver INTO the notch, you just catch the edge of the notch to CAREFULLY AND SLOWLY drive it around. It WILL work,if you do it right.
Mike

master plumber mark
04-07-2005, 05:18 AM
the only sure way to do this is to get a hammer, a very small cold chisel with a sharp mean little edje
and a can of WD 40.


by spraying down that lip is will loosen it up a tad. They you simply have to chisle and cut that lip all the way into the drain. you are making a cut through that brass flange or lip and it willl eventyally give , keep spraying the wd 40 into the gap if it doesent give, you just got to keep cutting into the drain.

and of course you want to chisel in the direction (counter clock wise) to persuade the flange to come loose.

the only real risk you take with any approach is chipping the tub near youir attack point. Try not to "dig down " into the metal underneath the tub....

try not to hit the tub with your hammer on your back swing either. (thats bad)

just get a small sharp chisel and keep it eating on the brass only.

the WD 40 is optional. but it seems to at least morally help.

good luck.

captwally
04-30-2005, 06:44 PM
I am a newly appointed maintenance supervisor for a large 30 year old apartment complex. I have lots of experience in lots of things but sometimes I come up with something I need a bit of help with, I admit. One of the things is removal of a bathtub drain when the strainer and bottom cross has been torn out. I can answer a lot of the people's previously posted problems. (I guess this is late compared to those postings, but I just joined) The answer is not beating the hell out of the drain fitting or sawing a notch or wedge and using a hammer and chisel. The answer is a nice large easy-out or left hand extractor. It will twist right out without damaging the tub or porcelain finish. My problem is that I cannot find one! Can anyone help with a supplier that sells #9 and larger extractors, more commonly known as "Easy-Outs"? My largest is a #9 and it easily can remove a broken 1" fitting, but nothing larger. I know larger ones are manufactured, even for removing fittings up to 4 inches. Any Ideas, guys?

captwally
04-30-2005, 06:58 PM
BTW, I am not interested in saving anything but the Tub. I have lousy access from the bedroom closet through a 12" x 12" hole. I will be replacing all the drain fittings, but removing the tub is not an option. I could theoretically leave the drain elbow in place, but I can't un-thread the tee that holds the tub stopper until that drain flange has been removed.

RioHyde
04-30-2005, 07:34 PM
Captwally, if you can find one let me know. However, cutting a wedge out of the drain flange and prying it out isnt that difficult...for me anyway. Of course I've been removing old drain flanges this way for a long time and the old timer who showed me how, even longer.

Clayton
04-30-2005, 07:48 PM
Give the rectorseal golden extractor a try...

I picked one up about a month ago at a trade show and it works pretty nice. But, I've already had a couple drains it won't take apart and any easy-out wouldn't have helped either. So I was back doing it the way my dad taught me, with the 15 cent 6" hacksaw blade and my flat screwdriver, gets them out everytime.
I also have an old Ridgid multi sized internal pipe wrench that fits alot of the drains and will take some of them apart also. The problem is, the threads can be so corroded or "fused" together that it doesn't matter whether you use an easy-out or anything that will try to unscrew the drain, It won't work because it will break the waste shoe off at the fine threads on the 90. Then it just spins in the tub unless you have a helper or someway of rigging a backup on the drain shoe under the tub. So even if you spend all that extra money on nice tools, they don't always work.

captwally
04-30-2005, 08:08 PM
Why do we do this for a living? Trying to unthread 30 year old things behind walls through a tiny opening, snaking roof vents, drains and pulling huge wads of hair out... Hmmm..... Shouldn't I be on a beach in the Caribbean?

captwally
04-30-2005, 08:20 PM
Thanks, Clayton

If we could be enhanced in some way, most people say they would want wings. Well, I'm already a pilot, but what I could really use is an extra elbow and an eyeball on the end of one of my fingers. I found a source for the Ridgid Internal wrench, and will try that (My Tenants can't wait either). It looks promising.

Brainodo
05-07-2005, 12:57 PM
Hello,

I am just a newbie here and wanted to say thanks. I had the same problem with the two bath tubs in my house. I was looking around on the internet and looking for a tool to remove the drains and saw this post and decided to get the hack saw and screw driver a shot and WHOOPPPEEE it worked like a charm on both drains. :D :D

Thanks again you guys saved me some time and money.
Terry

michaelait
12-30-2007, 02:36 PM
Hi, new to this forum. Yes, I tried all the other ideas for removing flange, without success. I gave up and tried the hack saw, cut out wedge idea. It worked like a champ. I cut out an area the length of the flange and about 1/2 inch wide. Then I took hammer and chisel and the piece popped out. Then it was a matter of hammering carefully to pry loose the entire flange. It then began to un-thread. I am a happy camper.:) Thanks to you folks for the idea. Happy New Year (2008)!

jimhls
01-02-2008, 05:54 AM
I used the saw blade to cut the notch in my drain then the tapping with a hammer and screwdriver and it worked.
THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU. This site and you guys were a big help.

Jim


Hello.

I'm hoping someone might have an idea or two for me on this subject.

I have two bath tubs that have drains that need to be replaced. The problem is that I can't get them out. They are in such bad shape that the crossmembers are all busted off that the tub drain removal tool is supposed to use to unscrew and remove.

The suggestion that was given to me by Home Depot and Ace Hardware is to hammer a screwdriver (or something) into the side of the drain to use for leverage. I can't even manage to do that. (I can barely put a dent into it.) I thought about trying to drill a hole into the side of it but I'm scared to do that because I don't want to go through and damage the threads preventing putting a new one in.

Does anyone have any advice on how I can get these drains out and still be able to screw in new one?

Thanks very much!!!

Herk
01-03-2008, 07:47 AM
Well, now that it's done, I'll tell you how I do it. (Sorry, I didn't notice this sooner.)

I use a Dremel tool with a carbide blade. (Wear goggles!) I cut a ring at the same level as the tub, below the flange of the strainer, and the top of it pops right out. Then, if I need to get the rest out of the strainer, I use a small screwdriver and hammer to pop the brass threads away from the shoe. This can be a problem if the tub drain isn't accessible, in case the old rubber joints get messed up. But usually, I'm replacing the entire drain so getting the strainer loose from the tub is all I'm interested in.

shimp
01-27-2008, 05:50 PM
get a dremel tool, u'll be able to cut /grind as needed, even from inside the drain once u cut away the screen

citm2000
10-24-2008, 01:23 PM
The dumbell tool was the first thing I tried -- the crossmember broke immediately. I bought an expensive tool called the drainkey, which expands upon turning in the direction that should loosen the drain, but it just turns freely, no matter how tight I try to make it.

I attempted to cut a notch in it to use the screwdriver trick and it would seem that the THING IS MADE OF PLASTIC!!!!! :eek:

It wasn't a layer of metal that had corroded -- it was some sort of metal flake/veneer that had begun to peel off. The drainkey just digs up the plastic inside the flange's pipe piece.

The notch I cut in the flange fortunately doesn't go all the way through, but it was immediately apparent that I was cutting into plastic, not metal.

I'm not sure how to proceed. If I cut off the flange from the rest -- what if I cannot get the remaining piece with the male threads out of the inside of the pipe?

citm2000
10-24-2008, 02:38 PM
OK - it isn't actually made of plastic -- just some dull grey soft metal. I don't think it's old enough to be lead (house built in 1988). It has some flaky shiny veneer which is peeling off (the reason for replacing it in the first place.

I cut a couple of notches and tried to hammer on it, but the screwdriver is actually driving into the metal instead of moving it. Any ideas?

hj
10-24-2008, 02:55 PM
IF the "cut a slot out and fold the drain towards the center", does not make sense to you, then you may have to have a plumber do it for you. If it is done wrong, you WILL be replacing the tub, or at least damage the surface, depending on the type of tub.

citm2000
10-24-2008, 03:03 PM
IF the "cut a slot out and fold the drain towards the center", does not make sense to you, then you may have to have a plumber do it for you. If it is done wrong, you WILL be replacing the tub, or at least damage the surface, depending on the type of tub.

I understand cutting the slot just fine -- I'm not sure about folding the drain towards the center.

I don't care about damage to the surface of the tub -- it's going to be replaced in a few years. I just need it to hold water and not leak.

I have cut the slot, but the screwdriver is digging into the metal, rather than breaking it loose and getting it to turn.

jadnashua
10-24-2008, 04:06 PM
Carefully cut it and then pound it towards the middle, peeling it away from the threads. If you make several cuts, you should be able to get a chunk out, then it should all come apart.

citm2000
10-24-2008, 05:52 PM
Carefully cut it and then pound it towards the middle, peeling it away from the threads. If you make several cuts, you should be able to get a chunk out, then it should all come apart.

Thanks for clearing that up. It's slow going so far, but I'm making some progress. I'm beginning to wonder if some kind of epoxy was used instead of plumber's putty.

Redwood
10-25-2008, 06:49 AM
RTV Silicone?

A popular misapplication for the stuff.

citm2000
10-27-2008, 07:32 AM
This thing continues to surprise and frustrate me. I did exactly as recommended, and cut out a few chunks, and, sure enough, the entire lip/flange broke free. I put my drain key in there and expected to be able to just back it out, but it would only turn through one or two degrees of arc before I met enough resistance that the drain key slipped.

I cut several more, each time knocking the "petals" in towards the center, but it still won't break free. At this point, about half of the flange is missing (many of the petals broke off when I drove them into the center), and about half of it has been knocked away from the threads -- at least towards the top -- but it still won't budge. Even more surprising was what I found under the flange -- regular plumber's putty. I don't understand why this thing won't budge. Even if some of the putty got down into the threads (there was a tremendous amount of it under the flange -- over a quarter inch thick), you'd think that this would be moving by now. Any more ideas?

citm2000
10-31-2008, 09:32 AM
Update -- well it didn't go well. It appears that the installer used plumbers putty (the old kind that hardens) not only to seal the flange, but also as pipe threading compound. On one side I used a mini hack-saw blade to cut all the way to the threads on the section down in the drain pipe. Even still, getting that one section seperated from the PVC was next to impossible, and each part that came off (it broke several times) had hardened plumbers putty in the threads.

Eventually what happened is that the pipe separated from the bottom of the tub (what little was left of the flange broke off) and I had nothing to give it resistance when I was trying to pound free the other sections I had cut. I'm down to opening the wall in the bathroom (which is wallpapered -- figures) and the ceiling below (textured -- figures). I was hoping the drain assembly would be connected with threaded fixtures like a lavatory drain, but it is not. There is one PVC fitting right behind the overflow, and another right under the drain assembly, and they are cemented to regular PVC pipe which goes to a T-fitting which is also cemented. The t-fitting is cemented to PVC pipe which goes down to the cemented on trap.

I have found single piece drain fittings that thread on like a lavatory drain that fit garden tubs. I am going to get one of those and glue on a fitting to the PVC above the trap that will let me connect it.

Anyone have tips on making a good cut in PVC drain pipe that is running vertical above your head with tight clearances?

murphy7312
12-06-2008, 06:51 PM
Like CITM2000 I also spent $40 on the expensive tool called the drainkey, and just as CITM2000 said it could not produce the force to remove the flange. I was putting incredible torque on and it just kept slipping.

So, after 2 months of thinking, $40 for the expensive tool, and a lot of grief from my family, I tried the hacksaw and chisel method recommended here (I think first by Mike?) and had that thing out in 10 minutes.

I understand the concept of the drainkey tool (which expands outward to grip the inside of the flange while twisting), but it somehow has simple forces working against each other. The v-notch and chisel method is pure simple machine force.

Thanks all, one more technique down.
J. Murphy



The dumbell tool was the first thing I tried -- the crossmember broke immediately. I bought an expensive tool called the drainkey, which expands upon turning in the direction that should loosen the drain, but it just turns freely, no matter how tight I try to make it.

pilot guy
01-05-2009, 12:42 PM
Hi all. I needed to replace the drain in the acrylic tub so I googled it and arrived here. After reading the thread I went upstairs and grabbed my wife's hair dryer. Stuck it on the drain for 5 minutes.

I grabbed a hacksaw blade, and cut one vertical notch in the side of the drain. Using the flat screwdriver set against the notch, I tapped on the screwdriver with a hammer and succeeded in moving the drain slightly. I eventually made three other notches and got the drain out in about 5 minutes.

Thanks for the info here.

NEWBIE101
06-22-2009, 10:40 PM
i tried to take the drain plug out with the dumb bell and it twisted a halve a turn and popped and is more to one side than the other and i think it may be striped any ideas. i just wanted to check before i tried the v method

ed31
10-26-2009, 08:21 PM
I am having the same problem. . except i think my drain wasnt made with the cross pieces. . instead it has a small ridge that is about 1/16th of an inch wide and the same deep. . on each side going from the top of the drain where the flange is to the bottom of the drain piece.. . .this looks like it would work. . .can someone tell me what they think. .



The Drain Key™


Expands with a crescent type wrench to unlock or install:

Bathtub drains
1-1/4" or 1-1/2" closet spuds
Jr. basket strainers, Jr. Duo strainers
Tray plug drains and duplex strainers

Removes 1-1/4" or 1-1/2" trap (dirty arm) nipples.

It's unique expanding design allows The Drain Key
to internally grip in a 360° pattern.

12789

morehelp
12-07-2010, 10:08 AM
I've got a nasty one with no crossbars. I have a surfing buddy who is a plumber and he said the Master Drain Extractor works best for him so I'm going to order it from their web site. There's also a youtube video showing how it works.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY4JpDoMZmM

martinlp
02-07-2011, 06:52 PM
12788

No I don't work for this site but this what I use all the time I work in a very old apartment complex this happens to me all the time, I use to use the break a peace off method than hammer with flat screw driver counter clock wise all the time and it does work but can damage the tub depending on tub material.

http://www.azpartsmaster.com/Products/Extract-A-Drain-Tub-Drain-Removal-Tool__PAS4500.aspx

optics
04-12-2011, 01:53 PM
what is a v notch? cutting top and inside the flange?

hj
04-13-2011, 06:23 AM
quote; The suggestion that was given to me by Home Depot and Ace Hardware is to hammer a screwdriver (or something) into the side of the drain to use for leverage. I can't even manage to do that. (I can barely put a dent into it.) I thought about trying to drill a hole into the side of it but I'm scared to do that because I don't want to go through and damage the threads preventing putting a new one in.

STOP!!! DO NOT get advice from Home Depot, Lowes, or Ace Hardware. All of the procedures you list in the above paragraph are definite ways to destroy the entire drain and then you will have to do some remodeling to install a new one. I would be reluctant to tell ANYONE how to remove that drain because doing it even slightly wrong will damage the tub or destroy the drain assembly. A good plumber could remove both drains in less than an hour. There are "expansion" devices to remove drains without the crossbars, ASSUMING it will unscrew without breaking the under tub piping.

lswote
04-14-2011, 03:32 PM
The cross-posts in my bathtub drain basket corroded and broke off so there is nothing for a drain basket removal tool to grab and I don't think that the tool would work (am I wrong?). My bathtub is only 11 years old, but it is on a concrete slab so I don't have access to anything under or behind the tub and the tub has ceramic tile all around it so taking it out would be a big deal. Is there anything i can do to get the drain basket out so I can replace it?

jadnashua
04-14-2011, 08:25 PM
If you do get it out, the shoe it screws into may move, and it may be a big bear to replace. The techniques to remove it have already been described...there are tools that grab the crossbars (won't work in your situation), there's one that expands to grab the thing from the inside, and then there's the brute force method that essentially cuts a notch, then you use that to unscrew it or pry it away from the edge of the tub. The last can damage the tub if you don't take care.

jwatson
05-07-2011, 05:59 PM
We bought the Superior Drainkey and it screwed down into the drain. We then turned it to unscrew the drain and it got stuck and wouldn't turn anymore and the drain will not come out and neither will the drain key! Please help!!

Redwood
05-07-2011, 07:10 PM
get a bigger wrench

debc
05-09-2011, 07:23 AM
I've got a major problem with trying to remove my tub drain. First of all it seems like the plumber's putty has turned to epoxy! :( I have no access to the plumbing since the tub is a center drain and the drain is on located on the exterior wall. So no way to cut a hole. The plumbing is PVC pipe.

I have tried a Smart Dumbell wrench, the Tub Drain Key wrench, a hairdryer to soften the putty and cut a wedge into the lip to try and drive the drain out of the pvc pipe but none of the above methods have worked!

Half of the drain lip has broken away but the interior threaded portion of the drain has remained solid in the PVC pipe!

So this is my question .... Is there a way to tap the old drain to receive a new drain?
Or ... is there a way to ream out the old drain and re-thread the PVC pipe?

I should mention .... the PVC pipe does not seem to be anchored, it moves around when trying to work on the drain. I really do not want to damage the pipe because the tub is a Jacuzzi Tub and removing it is financially out of the question at this time. I do try to stabilize the PVC pipe by holding a screwdriver behind it while I work on it.

I really need help with this one! Thanks!

debc
05-09-2011, 02:53 PM
I'm glad to report that I was able to solve my jacuzzi tub center drain removal problem. I thought I'd post my solution so that it might help others with the same issue.

What I finally did was to borrow a Dremel tool and bought a tungsten carbide cutting bit for stainless steel. I then used the bit to cut a ridge into the side of the drain interior, being careful not to go too deep into the PVC pipe. Once that was completed I was able to get a small screw driver into the ridge, pry the drain towards the center and Voila! the entire drain was then very easily removed.

Installed the new drain, using teflon tape on the threads and plumber's putty. What a beautiful thing! :)

I had been fighting with this for 3 days! Hope this helps others.

hj
05-09-2011, 05:57 PM
Believe me, you will be money ahead to call a plumber, because the way you are being told to go at it will damage the tub.

NYC-DIY
05-17-2011, 10:16 PM
I am having my tub reglazed in a few days. Figured it was a good time to remove and replace the drain which is rusty looking, and simlar for hte overflow which is broken and looks like it was glazed but should by chrome colored.

Question: Can I easily remove these myself just before or while the glaze guy is here? Is it just a matter of unscrewing them both? I think that is standard for a drain, but is it similar for the overflow? (the tub glaze guy said he can sometimes do the overflow, but can't do the drain and those sometimes pose problems) From what I've read online, the drain should be easy (with specialized tool or even just with something to get torque like inserting handles of pliers and then using screw driver as a handle), but can't find much on the overflow. Any advice on one or both is greatly appreciated!

Picture attached.

Thanks,
Mark

NYC-DIY
05-17-2011, 11:15 PM
BTW- On first inspection I did NOT notice a bolt or screw in the overflow drain. I can look closer if someone thinks its there, or is it possible this thing is screwed directly onto the tub, or just attached with sort of epoxy or something?

Terry
05-18-2011, 12:11 AM
A bolt or screw will hold the overflow cover on.
And the drain threads out.

lainfla
05-21-2011, 04:31 PM
Yes, there are ! They're not because I'm yelling, but frustrated to no end...
I'm not mechanically inclined at-a l l. So I can read the posts but I simply cannot get the picture in my head.

I purchased the Tub Drain Dumbell wrench, however, there are only two tiny notches b/c someone, apparently prior to me has worked on this tub prior, and broke that cross
thingy. Anyhow,

Does anyone know where there is a site that would actually show me a video on how to remove this piece of metal that has the drain blocked. I own no tools except for a blow dryer, a dumb bell( 3 lbs) and a screw driver, which stared to bend slightly as I attempted to bang on it after I stuffed the opening with a plastic bag to make it atleast be even with the notches.

I haven't had a shower in a week and I'm desperate...

Tub Refinisher
05-31-2011, 08:05 PM
Whenever I have a drain that won't come out, or the crossbars are gone, I just use one of these: http://www.buyeagle.biz/NuFit-LT

No worries. They fit beautifully. I've used them on all kinds of tubs, refinished or otherwise.