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Chevy
10-24-2007, 08:43 PM
Hi, I'm new here and have been reading for some time now. Lots to learn that's forsure.

Anyways, I would like to winterize my own sprinkler system and I do not know what type of connect I need to attach my compressor hose to the tap. In the past my system has been winterized by the guys that installed the system and I never really paid that much attention to how they connected to the line.

The connector is a normal garden hose tap that they connect the compressor to, and the shut off valve is in the house. What type of connector can I purchase to screw onto the tape with the quick disconnect male on the other end?

Thanks in advance!

frenchie
10-24-2007, 09:14 PM
I don't think there's a one-piece for this.

I stood in the plumbing section at the local hardware, and put one together out of adapters: quick-connect to fine-thread, fine-thread to hose threads. Took 4 or 5 parts, total.

Screw em all together, there's your adapter.

Gary Swart
10-24-2007, 11:34 PM
As the previous respond says, there's no one way. You have to make up an adapter that will work for you. When I blow my system, I remove the backflow preventer. That is attached with 1" copper unions. For the outlet side, I made an adapter that has the mating union half, then reduced the 1" to 1/2" with a ball valve and the quick connect fitting for my air hose. I open one zone at the manifold, then open the ball valve and let it blow until the entire 60 gallon air tank is empty. Then I close the ball valve and recharge the air tank and repeat the process. Then I close the first zone and go to the second. I use 2 tanks of air on each zone. The pros using the big industrial compressors can blow the entire system with one connection, but that costs from $50 and up. It's mucho quicker, but I figure I make pretty good wages doing my own, especially since I already have the compressor.

I blow my daughter's one line with 3 hose bibs with a small compressor through the hose bib at the high end of the line. I use a PVC double female connector with a 3/4" to 1/2" bushing with the quick connect fitting screwed in the other end.

If you ever see the yard service guys going around with the big compressor, you might see that they have a huge collection of fittings so they can make up whatever they need quickly.

master plumber mark
10-26-2007, 03:03 PM
the yard fellas lug around a real big compressor behind their trucks for a good reason...

when they connect to your system it literally has so much
PSI and pressure that all the sprinklers literlly jump out of the ground at the same time.....
...

the big compressor kicks butt ,,,,
and thats what you want to do it right.....


how much do they carge you ??

Gary Swart
10-26-2007, 06:12 PM
I've been doing my own for several years, but I believe the last time I had it done it was $50. I'm sure it's closer to $100 now. My 7-1/2 HP single stage compressor with a 60 gallon tank is slow by comparison, but my time is mine and since the compressor is sitting in the shop, it just makes sense to spend a couple of hours a year and save the $100. But, you're sure right about those big compressors kicking butt!

theelviscerator
10-26-2007, 10:02 PM
the yard fellas lug around a real big compressor behind their trucks for a good reason...

when they connect to your system it literally has so much
PSI and pressure that all the sprinklers literlly jump out of the ground at the same time.....
...

the big compressor kicks butt ,,,,
and thats what you want to do it right.....


how much do they carge you ??


Psi and pressure?


Hmmm...


how bout PSI and CFM?

frenchie
10-29-2007, 10:06 PM
And actually, you don't need much presssure - my irrigation guy says about 40 psi'll do most zones - it's volume that's important for blowing out irrigation systems.

The conversation started, because I noticed his compressor has no tank. He removed just the actual compressor & carries that around, it's lighter & easier.

Bob NH
11-03-2007, 07:38 PM
You can get an air hose quick-connect adapter in 1/4" pipe thread, male or female. Just get a reducing bushing that takes any convenient pipe fitting or valve down to 1/4" pipe and screw in your adapter.

I would probably put a 1/2" ball valve off a tee and put a 1/2 to 1/4 bushing in it for the air connection.

If your hose doesn't correspond to 1/4" pipe, then get the correct size.

GShelton
11-09-2007, 07:50 PM
You can actually buy the adapter you need from a RV store. It is called a blow out plug. Here is a link to Camping World. (I am an RVer and we have to winterize the RV.)

http://www.campingworld.com/browse/skus/index.cfm?skunum=4410&src=SRQB

Hope this helps.

frenchie
11-10-2007, 05:03 AM
The top end doesn't look like a quick-connect... and the bottom end's male threads...? I'm confused as to how this'd work on a house plumbing system, or an irrigation sytem...

My home-made job's with female threads, so I can attach it to any convenient hose bib or drain, and a quick-connect on the other end.

I just closed up the house, sorry I forgot to take a pic.

Jeremy123
09-17-2009, 11:45 PM
You can find the proper type of adapters to connect your air compressor to garden hose or underground sprinkler system at
http://www.lawn-aerator-attachment.com/air_compressor_to_garden_hose_adapter.html

Gary Swart
09-18-2009, 08:58 AM
If you can't spend 10 minutes in a plumbing store to figure out a fitting combination that will adapt your compressor to you irrigation system, perhaps you should hire the lawn service to do this.:eek:

cn90
10-12-2009, 11:01 AM
For those who want to connect Air Compressor to Hose Bib, here is the setup I use (cost about $8 to put it together):

- Part 1 is the standard 1/4" Air Compressor fitting
- Part 2 is Adaptor to go from 1/2" (Female end of the Hose Coupling #3) to 1/4"
- Part 3 is Hose Coupling.
Ace Hardware PN 71941
http://www.acetogo.com/product/71941/coupl+hose+34fhtx12fip.html

Use Teflon and you are good to go.

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8620

bunkers
10-14-2009, 04:59 PM
I did something like that last year, but then when I used it (even though I only attached it loosely), the thing came apart and got stuck inside the backflow and I had to destroy it getting it out with vicegrips.

If you put on of these rigs together, how to get them to stay put (together) ?

cn90
10-19-2009, 12:40 PM
I did something like that last year, but then when I used it (even though I only attached it loosely), the thing came apart and got stuck inside the backflow and I had to destroy it getting it out with vicegrips.

If you put on of these rigs together, how to get them to stay put (together) ?

This thing is brass and rock solid!!!
Use Teflon Tape and put them together tight using adjustable wrench.
It is bullet-proof!

cn90
11-02-2009, 06:35 AM
Follow-up:

This is the setup I have:

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8760

My Adaptor works fantastic:

http://www.terrylove.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8620

1. Water Supply Valve (in basement) closed.
2. Adaptor attached to Hose Bib #3.
3. Air Compressor set at 50-60 psi.
(I have a belt-drive compressor with max air flow 9 GPM at 50 psi, which is adequate).
4. I use the Blue Valve downstream of the Back Flow Preventer for control (On-Off). This is to keep pressure inside the BFP at 50 psi to prevent to floater from dropping down.
If you shut the Valve upstream of the Back Flow Preventer, pressure will drop and the floater will come down, making your winterization job much harder (air leaks out the top of the BFP).

5. Bleed each circuit 2-3 x with 6-8 min each.
6. Give the compressor sometime to cool off between runs.
7. When done, all valves (Testcocks, Blue Valves x2) set at 45 degrees.

- BFP covered in ziploc bag for winter.
- Hose Bib opened for drainage.
See you in the Spring!!!