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rmac-aquia
07-15-2007, 05:33 PM
Installed yesterday, works great.

A bit of info that might be helpful for diy'ers. My install required me to drill the holes in concrete. The instructions say explicitly that 1/4 inch holes are needed. This has to be a typo, at least for the hardware that came with my unit. The 4 larger bolts were 1/4 inch in diameter and the anchors were 3/8. NO WAY can those anchors be stuffed into a 1/4 hole. I tried 5/16's ... still too tight and finally drilled the holes to 3/8 and that was perfect.

The 2 smaller screw's needed a 5/16 inch hole.

This costed me several trips to the hardware store as I tried to figure out why those anchors would not fit.

So check your hardware before drilling larger holes, but if you are prepared to do so, it may save a good deal of time.

Also, be prepared with a longer supply line than you probably have, depends where your shutoff valve is relative to the back of the toilet. My hardware store had several lengths, but none of the toilet lines were long enough (I think 16 inchs was the max). I had get a union compression fitting to splice 2 lines together to make one that was long enough.

Complete Instructions for the Aquia written by Jamie (http://www.terrylove.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12606)

randyc457
07-15-2007, 08:06 PM
I logged in to report that I too have installed a Toto Aquia.

My installation was on a tile floor, and by far the hardest part was drilling the holes through the tile. It turned out that all my masonry bits were dull as mud, and wouldn't you know, by the time I discovered that, all the hardware stores were closed. So I just wore the holes through - took about an hour.

The other small issue was that the supply valve was installed too close in so that it just lined up with the side of the toilet base, and it stuck out from the wall too far. With the valve closed, the toilet JUST fit. No room to open the valve. I had to remove the valve, cut an inch off the pipe and remount the valve.

The toilet works very well. My previous one barely flushed at all, so I have a pretty low standard of comparison. However, it will take down a modest load of solid waste on the .9 gal flush. I have been advised by my friend who is a facilities maintenance specialist that, if you do that too much, waste may build up in the drains because there is not enough water to carry it on down. It may depend on when the plumbing was installed.

Happily flushing,
Randyc457

hlouiesj
07-18-2007, 12:26 PM
I too ran into the same problem with the holes not being the proper size to allow for the inserts, as called out in the installation instruction booklet. But I got around it by drilling slightly larger holes to allow for the inserts. Drilling through the tile floor was an issue as well with me. Fortunately, I borrowed a hammer drill and use masonry bits to drill through it. I spend most of my times cutting and tiling the tile floor and allowing for the thinset mortar to set properly. I end up having to use two wax rings to seal the adapter that mount to the closet flange, since the tile flooring and the additional thinset layer of mortar added to the height of the floor and making the closet flange lower than floor level.

Once the holes were drilled, mounting of the toilet presented no problem. Due to tile floor and toilet not seating well, I had to shim the back of toilet a little bit to get a solid seating to floor. I was able to use the old water lines and valves since they were replaced only a few years ago when I had the whole house re-piped with copper. I love the fast flush, saving on water, and look of the toilet.

Toilets work well. Only problem was if you have a lot of excrement, then a second flush is required to clear the bowl well. Other than that, the new toilet uses a lot less water and flushes very fast compared to the old one.:)