PDA

View Full Version : Anyone use Fiberock?



enviroko
05-04-2007, 06:06 AM
I'm putting on my bathroom floor and probably the shower walls. Any opinions on it? I like the fact that it is made from recycled materials and made in my home state, Ohio.

Thanks!

Dan Pick
05-06-2007, 07:58 AM
Good stuff........I used it on my bathroom floor as a water resistant barrier prior to setting tile. Very similar to "Hardibacker". 1/4" is great to work with, but 1/2" is extremely difficult to score and snap even with a carbide scoring tool.

enviroko
05-06-2007, 10:04 AM
Thanks Dan

Verdeboy
05-06-2007, 10:06 AM
Good stuff........I used it on my bathroom floor as a water resistant barrier prior to setting tile. Very similar to "Hardibacker". 1/4" is great to work with, but 1/2" is extremely difficult to score and snap even with a carbide scoring tool.
Is it easier to cut it rather than trying to score and snap it? Using a circ. saw with carbide-tipped blade? Or rotozip with underlayment bit?

geniescience
05-06-2007, 12:10 PM
these boards produce a lot of dust, fibrous and cementitious. Dangerous to health. A big wet saw ($1000) will cut it with little dust. A small wet saw will cut it with little dust, but be hard to manouver.

Score and span is the best way to cut it without buying the big wet saw. Some dust is made; it can be reduced by keeping wet sponges on hand and leaving lots of water on the board. Any power tools will throw a thousand times more dust up into the air. Many people have written about how bad that kind of dust is, and how it gets into everything.

2.
About using Fiberock or Hardibacker on a shower wall: technically speaking, they are not waterproof enough to be shower membranes all by themselves. See the web site. Call the manufacturer. You still need waterproofing, either a liquid substance which hardens or a sheet material which you thinset on.

For bathroom floors there is no requirement for a waterproof membrane.

david

Verdeboy
05-06-2007, 12:14 PM
these boards produce a lot of dust, fibrous and cementitious.
Naturally, I would want to cut the stuff out of doors.
Would the skil-saw or rotozip do the job?

jadnashua
05-06-2007, 06:18 PM
A carbide blade will cut the stuff, but the dust is both hazardous to you and your tools - very abrasive - it will shorten the life of the thing.