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Lorob
04-20-2007, 08:19 PM
Hello:

I purchased a 2 acre property that has almost 100 Toro shrub rotors (i.e. non-pop-up) installed in the late 80s. The model numbers state series 300-02 or 300-03. They have the metal adjustable nozzles.

As I gradually update my isntallation I have numerous extra parts from the older 300s which I am trying to use to prolong the life of my existing 300 series system.

The problem is that I can not understand why swapping parts for the same model doesn't always work. I am trying to find a good explanation of how they should work, cleaned and restored. Inside the top of the head they have a rubber gasket with spokes, the metal nozzle and the plastic top itself which includes the set screw and can be seperated into two circular halves.

A typical symptom is the water comes gurggling or flooding out erratically instaed of the nice clean fingers of water you see in good working rotors. Any advice or pointers to good reference material would be most welcome.

Incidentally, I am gradually replacing them with the newer 340 shrub rotor, but it is hard to find this newer model (e.g. Home Depot in my area stopped carrying it). I like this unit alot, the ability to fit on both 1/2" as well as 3/4" risers, as well as the great selection of nozzles that come prepackaged is very convenient. Why don't the bigger retailers who carry most Toro parts include this line?

Thanks for your help!

Verdeboy
04-20-2007, 11:49 PM
Are you sure they're "non-pop-up". In my experience, sprinkler heads that remain above ground have a very short life span.

I've always replaced any Toro sprinkler heads with Rainbird. Maxi-Paws for large areas and Misters for smaller areas. I especially dislike gear-driven heads (of all brands). I think that's what you have, but I'm not sure. The gear-driven are a pain to adjust and don't cover as well as the Maxi's.

BTW, the Rainbird Maxi-Paws are also designed to connect to 1/2" or 3/4". In addition, they make a spin-out wrench that lets you change the guts of the head without having to do any digging.

Wet_Boots
04-25-2007, 04:00 PM
Hello:

I purchased a 2 acre property that has almost 100 Toro shrub rotors (i.e. non-pop-up) installed in the late 80s. The model numbers state series 300-02 or 300-03. They have the metal adjustable nozzles.

As I gradually update my isntallation I have numerous extra parts from the older 300s which I am trying to use to prolong the life of my existing 300 series system.

The problem is that I can not understand why swapping parts for the same model doesn't always work. I am trying to find a good explanation of how they should work, cleaned and restored. Inside the top of the head they have a rubber gasket with spokes, the metal nozzle and the plastic top itself which includes the set screw and can be seperated into two circular halves.

A typical symptom is the water comes gurggling or flooding out erratically instaed of the nice clean fingers of water you see in good working rotors. Any advice or pointers to good reference material would be most welcome.

Incidentally, I am gradually replacing them with the newer 340 shrub rotor, but it is hard to find this newer model (e.g. Home Depot in my area stopped carrying it). I like this unit alot, the ability to fit on both 1/2" as well as 3/4" risers, as well as the great selection of nozzles that come prepackaged is very convenient. Why don't the bigger retailers who carry most Toro parts include this line?

Thanks for your help!

"They have the metal adjustable nozzles" ~ got a photo? Stream Rotors were best known for their non-adjustability, which also meant there was nothing to fall out of adjustment.

Old stream rotor nozzles that give out sloppy watering are simply worn. No pro will trouble themselves with one, when they can install a replacement.

"Why don't the bigger retailers who carry most Toro parts include this line?" ~ Toro reserves their 'good stuff' for professional installers/repairmen, and retail outlets get different products. Since they have a low-rent version of a stream rotor (different in almost every respect) you won't see the real thing at a retail outlet.