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alleycat
02-25-2007, 09:37 AM
Can it hurt anything? I want to clean the kitchen sink sprayer and the toilet tanks to dissolve hard water crud. An internet search suggests the toilet tank is okay as long as it isn't left for too long (how long is too long?) and that it's okay on chrome sprayers only - not sure why only chrome -
thanks for any advice.

Cass
02-25-2007, 09:46 AM
Use it without any worry.

Gary Slusser
02-25-2007, 02:04 PM
Vinegar is an acid and acids eat metals.

You probably need a water softener. I suggest a correctly sized softener with a Clack WS1 control valve.

Dunbar Plumbing
02-25-2007, 02:32 PM
Can it hurt anything? I want to clean the kitchen sink sprayer and the toilet tanks to dissolve hard water crud. An internet search suggests the toilet tank is okay as long as it isn't left for too long (how long is too long?) and that it's okay on chrome sprayers only - not sure why only chrome -
thanks for any advice.


Vinegar, CLR, Lime-Away all work good.

Most people will put aerators in a cup to clean with vinegar or take a sandwich bag and fill it up and tie it off to a showerhead without taking it off to clean the small openings.

alleycat
02-25-2007, 04:29 PM
thanks everyone
so far, I've found lemons and vinegar to be effective and inexpensive ways to deal with hard water deposits. We looked into water softeners in my last house but I don't like the idea of regularly pouring bags of salt into my septic or my backyard

Gary Slusser
02-26-2007, 08:34 PM
Some facts may help eleviate your concerns:
http://www.epa.gov/ord/NRMRL/pubs/625r00008/html/fs3.htm
http://tinyurl.com/63bq7
http://wqa.org/sitelogic.cfm?ID=212

Cookie
02-26-2007, 09:07 PM
I have been cleaning for 10 years now with just vinegar and water. Sometimes, a lemon juice. I will tell you what I would stay away from the other products, like lime away, CLR, etc, no one wants to hear this, but, I was using that stuff before I was diagnosed with a very deadly cancer. It is up to you folks, but, just my 2 cents worth. You live in the air you breathe.

I do use a windex on the windows. I use a dishsoap for scrubbing the tub, and vinegar in the toilet bowl. Take it for what it is worth, but, mine is a reality you would not want in a heart beat. Take the precautions.

hj
02-27-2007, 04:35 AM
Lemon and vinegar are very weak acids. The only problem in the toilet tank is the plastic parts. The tank itself is impervious to all household materials.

Cookie
02-27-2007, 05:16 AM
Well, after 10 years one would think if it were going to eat away the inside of the toilet or parts, it would had been by now. If anything is caustic is the cleaning products theirselves. The vinegar is diluted anyways with the water in the bowl. The only other chemical I do use in my home is bleach. That is because I am 2 percent of the population who has had cancer of the immunity system, so, I do use bleach to kill germs on somethings like handles on doors and the bathroom floor. Even then, I use very very little. A minute amount, diluted with hot water. I did try the teflon product once, just to see if it worked, and it does. But, I would not use that on a steady basis. Just my 2 cents worth, take it for what it is worth. Use everything in moderation.

prashster
02-27-2007, 07:54 AM
Vinegar is good for cleaning windows and as a mild weed killer.

Cookie
02-27-2007, 08:05 AM
Good for a cheap perfume, too. :D
Try to find that at Saks.
*Prashster, I make all my many dates hungry, lol.

alleycat
02-27-2007, 05:14 PM
Some facts may help eleviate your concerns:
http://www.epa.gov/ord/NRMRL/pubs/625r00008/html/fs3.htm
http://tinyurl.com/63bq7
http://wqa.org/sitelogic.cfm?ID=212

Thanks for posting those links Gary, but I'll stick with vinegar and lemon. I'm not a scientist and I'm sure that you know way more about this than I do, but I can't be persuaded that putting such big quantities of salt into the ground is an environmentally good choice, and the independent research still seems inconclusive to me.

Gary Slusser
03-01-2007, 06:47 AM
The vast majority of softeners I size and sell use less than 8 lbs every 7-8 days. I sell many softeners, 3 just yesterday.

alleycat
03-02-2007, 05:49 PM
So the three systems you sold yesterday will put 1095 pounds of salt every year into the environment. That's a lotta salt!

Gary Slusser
03-03-2007, 09:19 AM
Then in your opinion the environment is better off with those three households using more cleaners, shampoo, water, clothes etc. and suffer ruined water heaters using up to 30% more fuel to heat their hard water than using =< 8 lbs of salt per 8 days.

Now all those products are manufactured somewhere and they cause the environment problems too. So where do you see the least damage to the enviornment?

Would their using potassium chloride help?